The Conversation

Naked City Detectives, Harry Bellaver, Paul Burke, & Horace McMahon“There are eight million stories, in the Naked City. This..has been one of them.”Stirling Silliphant (The Naked City ABC TV series 1958-63)

The Rain

The sound of rain, and just not the sound of rain falling, but the sound of people talking about the rain at the end of what had may just have been the perfect vintage, seemed to divert attention away from the economy, at least for the time being. While the rain, and all the wine country conversations that the rain started, provided a welcome relief from the constant drone that it’s hard out there. It’s really not the time to take your eye off the ball and to forget the market challenges inherent since the onset of the ‘Great Recession.’ For each winery and each winegrower or vineyard owner there’s an unique story. The folks on the flats in mid-Napa Valley likely had a different take on this year’s growingDoug Shafer giving his take on Vintage 2009 season weather than the folks in Calistoga, Carneros, the Vaca or Mayacamas ranges, or in Western Sonoma County, Mendocino, the Willamette Valley, Walla Sun and rain in Oakville, CA looking at the RObert Mondavi Tokalon VineyardWalla or in Santa Barbara. While each unique story suggest a similar outcome, this is a vintage that will unfold over the next several years. Perhaps the critics will pronounce estimates of Vintage of the Century or speculate that the rain has dashed all hopes for a positive result. Perhaps I lack the prescience or the hubris to judge the future of an entire vintage during harvest and crush, but I do have an understanding that a vintage is the sum of the individual experiences of each participant. And, I have an understanding that it’s in the telling of your story that will connect you to your customers.

The Bounce

In this brave new world of permission marketing, and in this time of growing consumer detachment and cynicism driven by the perceived systemic failure of our financial and Henry Paulson,  Bush Treasury Secretary governmental institutions, a review of your traditional marketing message methods has been necessitated, even as the mixed message on the state of the economy is being delivered by traditional mass media. A mention of the names Paulson, Geithner, and AIG tend to initiate a gag reflex in even the most jaded observer. However, today the DowTimoth Geithner, Obama Treasury Secretary Jones Market Index reached a 12 month high and once again climbed above 10,000, in part driven by reports that Goldman Sachs made record profits in Q3. Also noted as a sign that the climb from the bottom is underway are stories in Ad Age Talent Works that Google is Hiring again; and The New York Times reporting that Apple profits are up 47% on Strong Mac Sales. The story on the state of the wine business is even more mixed. Like the citizens of the Naked City, each wine business has its own story, some up by 10%, some flat, and some down 30%. Many wineries are going through an extended period of stress. Vic Motto, Co-Founder, Chaiman and CEO of Global Wine Partners, a St Helena, CA wine industry iBank recognizes the industry wide stress; but, doesn’t see a significant long term dislocation in wine consumer’s buying behavior. Having heard the sea change story before, most recently with the Vic Motto, CEO and Chairman of Global Wine Partnersprediction that Two Buck Chuck would drive consumers permanently away from luxury wines. Didn’t happen. It’s Mr Motto analysis that the American wine consumer is ‘aspirational’ and that wine is and will be viewed as an ‘affordable luxury.’ I’m also in the camp that believes wineries that survive this very tough period will likely, at some point, see a return to the pre-recessionary trends in buying patterns. In an October 15th Associated Press interview, Safeway CEO, Steve Burd sees signs of the turnaround in an uptick in the coffee sales mix and a move back to growth in the premium wines segment.

The Conversation

Technology has provisioned wine industry CMOs with a whole new marketing tool kit. Technology is a tool to be used and appreciated, but not one to be viewed as the long hoped foThe CLUETRAIN Manifestor silver bullet. How we now communicate with our customers has dramatically changed with the development of the web, email, texting, blogs, video, Facebook and Twitter. And in this new paradigm there are three words that have become the mantra of this new technological world in which we all now communicate our stories: transparency, authenticity, credibility. I’d like to add one word, human. This commonsense point was first made in ‘The Cluetrain Manifesto,’ by Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls and David Wineberger, first online in 1999 then in print in 2001, Copyright © by Basic Books. BTW: a 10th Anniversary edition of this must read biz book is now available. While the 10 year timeframe has dated some of the jargon, the core concepts of the treatise remain, especially those listed in the seminal 95 THESES:

  1. Markets are conversations
  2. Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors
  3. Conversations among human beings sound human. They are conducted in a human voice.
  4. Whether delivering information, opinions, perspectives, dissenting arguments or humorous asides, the human voice is typically open, natural, uncontrived
  5. People recognize each other as such from the sound of this voice

The first five points in the “Cluetrain’ 95 THESES are a construct that is now an unavoidable communications directive for your consumer facing business. People grow your grapes. People make your wine. People sell your wine, and people buy your wine. Your story, while sharing traits with almost all others in wine’s corner of the CPG market, is unique to your circumstances.

The Case Study

Mike BenzigerIt was harvest time in the fall of 1994. Mike Benziger came out of the winery office to check on the grapes to judge when to start picking on the Family’s Estate Vineyard, located in a collapsed caldera on the Sonoma Valley side of the old dormant Sonoma Mountain volcano. Times were good. The vineyard was always busy from the days of the Glen Ellen Winery start-up through the launch of the premium value tiered Benziger Family Winery. Wines that always over delivered. Mike should have been smiling, but instead he looked troubled. He cocked his head as he stood on the edge of the vineyard, puzzled that he heard nothing. Nothing at all. Just up the hill at his home in Jack London State Park, he rememberedBenziger Family Winery Ariel Shot hearing birds chirping madly as the sun broke through the morning fog. But as he looked down the neatly groomed rows of vines, he noticed that there wasn’t a wild flower, a weed or a blade of grass on the bare dirt underneath the vines. As he walked the rows, Mike noticed that there were no bugs on the vines or flying through the air, no dragonflies, no butterflies. Stopping and reflecting he knew what was bothering him, the vineyard was no longer a living space. Mike thought a moment and considered his options. He knew that this wasn’t the way things should be. At that moment in time he vowed to change the way things had been done, to change the conventional wisdom of how things had always been done. This ancient bowl had supported life Benziger Family Winery Bloggers Visitfor millions of years, and in just a decade of intensive modern farming that had all changed. But, it wasn’t working any longer, and the Benziger farming practices needed to revert to the old ways, to the ways defined by closed system agriculture. Benziger Vineyards needed significant cultural change to recreate a new living farm. And change they did, after 3 years of concentratedThe Insectary at Benziger Family Winery study, a sustainable, biodynamic vineyard started to take shape. The first step was to establish biodiversity. So island gardens were established within the vineyard space to help support beneficial insects; and between every 10th vine row a bed of host plants and flowers were seeded to support a vineyard population of the good guys. Sheep and cows were introduced as natural lawn mowers, with their waste the base of a closed system compost program, so that no chemical fertilizers would ever be needed or would ever be used. Land that was dead just ten years ago was, in less than a decade, now a classic biodynamic closed system living farm. Earth, nature and man came together in a special place that happens to be in my backyard, just north of the town of Sonoma.

Mike Benziger & Kathy Benziger Threlkeld talking with the wine bloggersOn Saturday, October 3, 2009 I had the opportunity, along with a group of wine blogger colleagues, to hit the Benziger Biodynamic Trail at the Benziger Family Winery on Jack London Ranch Rd, just up the hill from the village of Glen Ellen. Our tour group had the opportunity to interface with Mike BenzigerKathy Benziger Threkeld, Colby Eirman, Director of Gardens, and Winemaker, Rodrigo Sotto. The passion in the delivery, even from the well practiced folks at Benziger, was  impressive, especially in closeColby Eirman, Director of gardens at Benziger family Winery quarters over 3 hours. This was a one-on-one conversation and the telling of the story, starting with that moment of enlightenment in 1994. There wasn’t any ducking questions in the active exchange of ideas. We weren’t being sold on a story. We were being invited into an experience. This was a conversation between humans. A few points really stuck with me. The first was that ‘the wines weren’tRodrigo Soto, Winemaker at Benziger Family Winery necessarily better, but that they were different.’ That they reflected this place. The second point that hit a nerve with me was that ‘each year the wine was a time stamp of the vintage.’ Not once were scores mentioned as a descriptor of any of the Benziger grown and produced wines that we tasted that day, although the Rodrigo Sotto’s wines have gotten rave reviews and scores in the traditional wine press. My take away from the day with the Benziger Family and team members was one of transparency, authenticity, and credibility. A team that understood that their plan, in a world now dominated by pull marketing, was that by communicating in this human voice missionaries were created, replicating the message and influencing friends.

The grandchildren of the founder of Park Benziger & Company, and the children of the founder of Glen Ellen Winery, Bruno Benziger are well versed in the finer points of wineNow that's biodynamic, at Benziger Family WInery marketing. But, change must be in their DNA. First selling Glen Ellen, then converting a 200,000+ value brand to a slightly more than 110,000 caseMike Benziger pointing out the native raptor population at Benziger Family Winery sustainable, biodynamic super-premium/luxury brand, while changing their farming practice as stewards of the land. In a time of declining circulation numbers and disappearing newspapers, an effort has been made to maintain contacts with the traditional press, in both the wine and consumer lifestyle focused print media arenas. The Benziger marketing team has fully embraced new media, including Twitter, and wine bloggers. Benziger POS is also available as an online deliverable, further enhancing the green story, while insuring the timely delivery of product sheets, neckers, sell sheets and cut case cards on an as needed by market basis. If you go to the Trade/Media section of the Benziger web site, you can download the Chris Benziger narrated video sales presentation which is a masters class in wine brand marketing. And, if you ever find yourself near Glen Ellen, stop-in and take the tour. As a small family wine marketer, you need to identify and mirror the success stories. The Benzigers have successfully differentiated their wine brands in this difficult, brand saturated market. And, by the way, their wines just aren’t different, the Benziger wines exhibit a specific point of view and IMHO are damn good.

The Story

Mike Benziger in the wine caves at Benziger Family WineryThe Benziger family and team recognized that their best path to the market was through their authentic story told in a human voice to groups of consumers, members of the trade, and to traditional and new media writers. A story that has been replicated to the point that in 2008 almost 175 million media impressions were created. Even though the Benzigers produce in their Demeter Certified Winery 1.32 million bottles of wine, the consumer impressions and strong word of mouth campaign along with a vibrant visitor center program help to create demand beyond the produced supply.  Through their objective mastery of pull marketing tactics, tactics based on an authentic and credible story, the Benzigers have been able to not only create an awareness envied by any enterprise wineco, but a model for any family wine business. The question that now begs to be answered: what’s your story and what are your winery’s marketing plans to maximize brand awareness and sales in what continues, even as the turnaround starts, to be a challenging marketplace?

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Revisiting Wine Marketing 101

Leo Burnett“If you don’t get noticed, you don’t have anything. You just have to be noticed, but the art is in getting noticed naturally, without screaming or without tricks.” … Leo Burnett

Chicken Little

Yes indeed, the sky may be falling. The Great Recession, which in the 6 months from September 2008 through March 2009 stripped in excess of $6.6 trillion from USA personal wealth, may be with us for awhile. The access to credit that drove US consumer spending behavior and the economy has largely evaporated. Although consumers have paid down debt at aiDepression Bread Lines coming soon to your neighborhood record pace, banks continue to reduce credit availability, expecting to retract an additional $1.5 trillion by lowering home equity loan access, consumer credit card limits and commercial lines of credit, restricting the ability of the US economy to recover recent spending patterns. Something lost in the swirl of marketing images from luxury Paneri Watchesconsumer brands such as Panerai Watches, Hasselblad, Hermes, Ferrari, Tom Ford, Christian Louboutin, Michael Kors, et alia, is that under the aura of glitz America has been on sale for quite sometime. Just like disco, to many consumers the idea of the luxury brand may be dead, at least for the foreseeable future. Value has coexisted with the concept of brand as long as brand has existed. It’s the yin and yang of the retail continuum. Walmart created explosive growth in the 1990’s with the concept of everyday low prices, and then created significant competition to chain grocers with the introduction of consumables in both Walmart and Sam’s Club stores. Costco has been in the game for awhile, and has become a major factor in wine sales. Target introduced the idea of designer products at value pricing, and now will match Walmart pricing toy for toy this Safeway Cut Case Wine Display w/Sale pricingChristmas. And then there’s Amazon. Amazon is no longer just your bookstore, but now a major online retailer across several categories of consumer goods and electronics. And, as soon as the compliance situation, delayed by the well documented situation at New Vine Logistics, can be sorted Amazon will be a major factor in wine sales. Trader Joe’s introduced the concept of healthful foods at value pricing back in the 1970’s. With the latest US Labor The Economic Elevator's going SouthDepartment statistics pegging the jobless rate at 9.8%, this is a dramatic understatement of the now real number that’s closer to 17% including people no longer actively looking for work and those now underemployed and working non-benefited minimum wage part-time jobs. It’s not surprising to see major retailers and grocers follow a strategy of value pricing. For anyone in this neck of the woods if you’ve been in Safeway recently the major merchandising theme is SAVE, and the yellow sale tags are inescapable. Lucky stores are following their philosophy of everyday low prices. And overriding this is a spirit of the new consumerism. It’s now cool to be frugal and save money.

The New Wine Consumer

San Francisco TrafficAs I worked my way to the Mission Street Garage traffic slowed to a crawl, in part due the rerouting of traffic away from Market Street. I was in the process of doing a NorCal broad market survey of grocery and independent package stores for a privately held family winery client, and it was time to break for lunch. Since my last two stops were in SoMa, I was headed to the food court in the Westfield Center, and to Charles Phan’s ‘Out the Door.’ Even though it was only 12:30 on an early October Friday, the joint was jumping. The food court was packed with shoppers, most holding multiple bags. The noise level sounded, well actually felt, like a low roar, creating a sense of excitement not present in the City’s shopping Out the Door at the Westfield Center, San franciscodistrict for several years. One of my early retail lessons at Disney’s Lake Buena Vista Village, was to look for the bags in shoppers hands as an indicator of a good or bad day, and this looked like a good day. All of this economic activity seemed to be driven by the aggressive mark-downs and clearances in the stores in the Center. Pricing motivated by the need to make room for holiday merchandise, and these pricing strategies seemed to be working. Consumers have been on the sidelines, even during the recent back to school shopping period in August. But sharp advertising and in store media seemed effective at getting shoppers to reopen their wallets. The efficacy of the various campaigns will be reflected in each stores daily flash reports. The tide may be turning, however slowly, as consumer sentiment seems to be Inflection Point Graphdriven by value, with the economic thermostat having obviously been reset. An economy that now seems more driven by consumer needs rather than by wants. And the need for value seems to be paramount as a new inflection point in consumer purchasing behavior has been reached. So, in an age of cash for clunkers, extended unemployment benefits and tight credit what can we do as wine marketers to meet the contemporary challenges of the market. Let’s take a quick revisit to the basics of consumer packaged goods marketing (I’ll try not to be too wonky) by first asking the following questions:

  • Who are the buyers?
  • How much will the buyers pay for my wine?
  • Where and how will the buyers purchase my wine?
  • How do I create buying situations?
  • Is the customer happy after purchasing my wine?

Marketing 101 Revisited

  • Product – the want satisfying offering of your winery (branding, packaging, product features)
  • Price – what you charge for your wines. Price is a measure of value. Price in the marketplace is a rough measure of how your consumers value your wines
  • Promotion – the communication of information between your winery (the seller) and the potential buyer in a defined channel (Place) that tends to influence attitudes and behavior
  • Place – making goods and services available in the right quantities and locations when your customers want them, resulting in the transfer of ownership from producer (your winery) to your customer/client, taking into account strategies and tactics applicable to any middlemen, brokers, marketing agents, wholesalers and retailers

Wine Business Monthly Top #0 US Wine CompaniesToday most wineries are micro marketers. Even wineries in the WBM Top 30 approach the market on a segmented basis. Micro marketing is the ‘performance of activities that seek to accomplish an organization’s (your winery) objectives (selling your wine on a timely basis) by anticipating customer or client needs (marketing research) and directing a flow of need satisfying goods (your wines) from producer (you) to customers/clients’ (via DTC, DTT, broad market).

It is important to understand that we are no longer in a wants period of aspirational or conspicuous consumption, but in period of meeting the specific identifiable needs oAbraham Maslowf your targeted audience. Without entering the maze of Abraham Mazlow’s ‘hierarchy of human needs,’ here are the basic definitions of wants and needs and demands:

  • Wants – desires for specific satisfiers of deeper needs; i.e., the particular choices (including types of products/specific brands) that consumers aspire to buy to satisfy perceived needs.
  • Needs – a state of felt or real depravation of some basic satisfaction (the difference between a consumers actual condition and their desired condition).
  • Demands – wants for specific products that are backed by an ability and willingness to pay for them.

Wine Consumers at Benziger WinerySo, as wine marketers it is important to understand that we don’t create needs. Needs preexist marketers and their brands. A marketers function is to influence wants. A good marketer takes the initiative in stimulating and facilitating commerce. A key part of this function is understanding the market and your consumer. So, how can one identify the best possible markets, and then influence consumer purchasing behavior? Engage your marketing research resources and ask:

  • Who are the people with identified wants?
  • Where are these people?
  • What’s their purchasing power?
  • What’s their buying behavior?

Having asked and answered the above questions, what degree of market exposure do you want, or more importantly can support with your production, allocations and resources, human and capital?

  • Intensive (ubiquitous distribution for large production, enterprise wine companies)
  • Selective (by channel for mid-sized winecos, or for products within an enterprise wineco where price dictates targeted distribution)
  • Exclusive (small- family winecos with limited channel distribution, or luxury brands model)

Having now identified your market and your desired level of targeted distribution, what sort of consumer behavior response do you want to engender – routinized response behavior or adoptive response behavior?

Routinized Response Behavior – the regular selection of a particular way of satisfying a need. This is typical of low involvement purchases, generics or purchases motivated by price or perception of price.

Adoptive Response Behavior – the demand for a specific product that meets, on a regular basis, the hierarchy of needs of a buyer, and the continued ability to purchase your wine(s). This is typical of high involvement purchases, usually of products (wines) within a consumer’s brand set.

Sale tags on all the winesAs a marketer, if you plan to sell your wines in a saturated market based only on price, in essence creating a commodity and not a brand, in what has to be by nature a rapid depletion exit strategy, then the idea of routinized response behavior is the way to go, and pricing and display allowances will be your primary marketing tactics. However, if you want to build a brand even in this challenging market, then engage in marketing tactics that create adoptive response behavior within your identified consumer set.

Wine Consumer Adoption Process

Awareness – comes to know your wine(s) through your brand awareness plan that may include category specific magazine reviews, scores, story placement, newspapers, blogs, forums, and social media.

Interest – the ease of finding information on your web site, forums, blogs and traditional wine press. Events like Twitter Taste Live, open that Bottle Night or Tweet-ups.

Evaluations – providing information and access to your wine. In addition to the traditional wine press new points of information such as Cellar Tracker, AbleGrape, and approximately 800 wine bloggers are a resource that you need to identify and utilize.

Trial – the chance to try before committing. Wine by the Glass, in-store sampling, winery tasting rooms, winemaker dinners.

Decision – to adopt or reject. A whole set of modifiers come into play, such as varietal, pricing, packaging, where and when available to purchase.

Confirmation – the reinforcement that the decision is good. This can be in the form of availability or rarity, appealing to cultural values (sustainable or biodynamic wines), based on acclaim, reviews or a wine blog, or on the affirmation from friends or family.

The Game

Twins beat Tigers in one game playoff 2009Without a thorough grounding in classic CPG marketing fundamentals and a clear understanding of wine brand marketing concerning human motivations in regards to purchasing behaviors, success in today’s highly competitive and product saturated marketplace is not likely for your winery. This somewhat academic take, a departure from my usual ‘how-to’ articles was written to encourage you, your winery’s marketing officer, to think about your current brand plan. Concerning your brand – what is it that you do and why do you do it? Is it working? What would you do differently? What are you doing to differentiate your wines? It’s not a time for indecision in your consumer facing wine business. Faced with declining sales in his collection line Michael Kors quickly introduced a consumer approachable ready to wear line and is thriving in a brutal retail market. Yes, times are tough, and consumer behavior has been reset, but commerce moves on. It is important to be in the game, so sharpen your pencils and fire up your synapses. Preparation and planning = performance.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Does your winery have an effective OND plan?

Dave Barry“Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice.”
Dave Barry

The End of Innocence

Now that, according to Chairman Bernanke, we’re at the end of the recessionary crisis, don’t you feel like you’ve been a passenger on Ozzy Osbourne’s ‘Crazy Train,’ and at the end of the ride Axl Rose is welcoming you to the jungle. Well, if one’s to believe all the press, it has been a jungle out there. Consumer behavior has been difficult to predict, as trends in recenJulia Childt spending patterns have only now begun to make sense. Consumer credit card debt has been significantly reduced, and there’s been a concomitant raise in the rate of savings from less than 1% of income to more than 5% resulting in a noticeable drop in consumer spending. An example of the nationwide impact on dining-out is demonstrated in today’s Zagat Survey PR release ‘SF Bay Area 2009 Zagat Guide San FranciscoDiners Adjust Habits in Response to Slow Economy.’ Wine sales and wine values as a result have been flat in the latest rolling 52 weeks report. Questions still remain as to the nature of any long term shifts in behavior, and if or when there will be a return to what was viewed as normal. Some of the analysis, even by those who’s insights we’ve come to value, of the situation have been somewhat myopic. Several of the changes in wine sales and marketing that we are now experiencing are fundamental structural shifts that were both exacerbated and accelerated by the recent hard times. There has been for some time a move from traditional white table cloth dinning to a more casual dinning environment, even with the increased sophistication of American cuisine . Guest check averages grew faster than the rate of inflation as business diners supported restaurants in urban MSAs. On-premises experiences have evolved and will continue to do so. Business expense accounts have been reigned-in as T&E budgets are rationalized to revenues. While its Jacques PepinAlice Watersseems surprising that entertaining at home has increased, Faith Popcorn was talking about nesting for aging boomers a decade ago The effect that Chuck Williams, Julia Child, Jacques Pépin, Alice Waters, et alia had on the American domestic cook has now made home dining chic. The shift in sales channels for premium and artisan wines from on-sale to off-sale, while well documented, has been a shift that’s been occurring for some time. A change that in part has been driven by frequently changing (desktop publishing) and more focused wine lists, and a vibrant off sale market driven by groceries, chains, club stores and innovative independents.

Let’s Get it Started

August 18th Start of Crush at Schramsberg It’s the last week in September marking the 1/3 point of the ’09 Crush. Now that some if not most of the Pinot and many of the white varietals are in-house, the seasonal harvest temperatures are starting to climb towards triple digits bringing smiles to the faces of vintners and growers throughout wine country. Most every year it’s a time of optimism, especially after what’s this year been referred to as an optimal growing season. Everybody at the winery seems busy in the pursuit of a zen-like perfection. Crews hovering over sorting tables thaRobert Conard at the C Donatieloo Winery sorting Pinot Noirt are now commonplace as all hands are on deck insuring that only optimal fruit makes it into the wine that you’ll be drinking in one to two years. Even if the hours are long and days-off are rare, it’s a vibrant time with midnight picking schedules, large farmer’s breakfasts, and plenty of beer at the end of the day. The economic panic of the last year, and the resulting decline in sales have been temporarily forgotten as all the physical and emotional energy is willingly put into the winemaking process . The intense process that is winemaking, as evidenced by the game faces displayed by winemakers, from Santa Barbara to Yakima and all the way to the North Fork of Long island, from the middle of August to the middle of December each year continues unabated until every lot is barreled down. The enthusiasm created by the annual wine grape harvest and the esprit de corps generated has often served as the launching vehicle for the important last quarter sales period. A period known within the beverage distribution industry as OND for the months of October, November and December.

Pump it Up

Judith Owen & Harry ShearerA late start to the upcoming holiday selling season has been forecasted by a number of beverage industry analysts. That may be the case, and we’ll all know soon enough. But hopefully, as the chief marketing officer your winery programing and promotions calendar is in place and ready to go on Thursday, October 1st. A reasoned look at the situation would seem to dictate that now is the time to get off your wallet and put on your seasonal game face. Differing sales channels will require unique tools structured to the idiosynchrocies of each. It will take innovative pricing structures to maximize your sales effort in Q4 of 2009. Christian Miller of Full Glass Research has shared that a recent survey of on-premises wine sales by the Wine Opinions Panel, revealed points of price sensitivity for list above $60/bottle, and $16/glass. So, depending on your resources it’s time to create programing for targeted restaurants accounts with this fact in mind. In addition to doing line-up tastings each working day at targeted restaurants, stick around for the early diners and offer an amusChuck Williams at the Maysonnave House in Sonoma, CAe bouches of a 1 oz pour of your listed or featured wine. As Chuck Willams said at the Maysonnave House this past week in Sonoma, ‘make the customer your friend.’ Also, spread your efforts across differing channels, hotels, catering, urban hot spots, large independents, ethnic cusine, entree specific and targeted lighthouse accounts. For off-sale, your POP materials, flow shelf talkers and back card should be pre-packed within the case. Provide high resolution, grabbable images on your winery web site for sell sheets, review talkers, labels bottle shots and tasting notes, etc. This will help to maximize ad placements and possible Sonoma Market Wine Displaydisplay activity. Discounting will be aggressive this OND, but you don’t have to compete with the big boys, be innovative in your tiered pricing, display allowances and use of coupons, including co-branding, non wine merchandise discounting, MIRs and occasional IRCs. Remember a basic rule in merchandising, hangers on 4-6 bottles, not on all 12 in a case. Oh, and Saturdays are great for in store tastings and/or bottle signings. If you’re relying on your tasting room and your wine club as your only DTC options, please consider the many other options available, such as third party wine clubs. This is a specific area in which sub-channel diversity will be the norm, but that’s not the case as yet. Assume the role this OND as a bleeding edge DTC leader.

Winter Song

Happy HolidaysI’ve been researching a series of articles written about the apparent market softness in the wine industry, and it seems that most of the noise is centered around the volumetric end of the business. As a small or mid-sized winery looking at flat as up, you can be much more innovative in your distribution strategy, and much more agile in the execution of your holiday marketing tactics. OND is your Crush time, so this selling season you should heed Warren Zevon’s words ‘I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead.’ The big boys aren’t sleeping at this time of year. Wineries in your competitive frame likely aren’t sleeping either. Go out there and shake a lot of hands, the hands of old and new friends. You can rest in January, at least for a few days.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

The Wake-up Call

Niccolo Machiavelli“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.”

… Niccolo Machiavelli

The Cult

My wife’s friend, New York based designer Joe Macal, told her that this summer in the Hamptons the wine selection on the party circuit is no longer the envy of the wine cognoscenti. The cult wines have been locked in the basement wine cellars of the McMansions, and the famous hosts just don’t think ostentatious displays of conspicuous consumption are cool in this economyHamptons Summer Party. Or so opined a vintner friend over Racer 5‘s in Healdsburg last week . I’m guessing there has been a sort of a reverse Veblen good effect going on here. Well, no doubt the tide is out. Wall Street has sneezed, and it’s looking less like a cold and more like the financial flu. The question being asked in the hills and knolls of wine country is ‘are we in a luxury goods recess, or has long-term consumer, even the most affluent consumer, behavior been modified?’ The luxury category segment of the American wine business known as the cult wine market has been on anKinked Demand Curve Model unprecedented run since 1990. While the term is new the concept isn’t. There have always been wines, as long as wines have been produced and sold, that commanded more attention and higher prices. Although we look at absolute pricing as an identifier of value, pricing is relative to the times, and through the inverted kink in the demand/pricing graph made famous by the late Dr Paul Samuelson in ‘Economics,’ and codified by John Forbes Nash in ‘Equlibrium,’ we’ve come to understand that the stratospheric pricing of cult wines infers on the host and guest the psycho-social attributes, as described by Berkeley’s Erving Goffman, of being accepted as members of the club. However, just ask Silas Lapham, membership in the club may not be long term.

The Call

Screaming EagleRinggggg, ringggggg, ringggggg. Sitting bolt up-right in my desk chair, looking past the glare of the iMac screen in the darkened room, I couldn’t believe that at 5 AM my iPhone was vibrating off the edge of my desk. Quickly shaking my head back-and-forth to loose the remnants of the mind numbing long night’s work of pushing ouHarlan Estatet pricing structures for a client’s new label project, I answered my phone without first checking the caller-ID. At the sound of the click the sonorous voice at the other end of the connection jump started the conversation. “Hi, sorry to call you so early, but did you read today’s Wall Street Journal article on the luxury wine market? Well, it struck home. My sales, for the first time in 15 years aren’t so great, and well, I’d like to toss around a few ideas.”

“Not a problem, I’ve been up working on a project, but no, haven’t read any papers this morning. Ah, excuse me. Who is this?”

“I’m that small cult winery, ha, that you pitched last year about this time and I told you I didn’t need any help. But I just got off the Araujophone with a management contact at my Boston asset management firm and, well, I need it now.” “I’ve replanted about half of my vineyard, changing the potential final blend, and the grapes are in 4th leaf. I could bottle the young juice in my primary brand, but the overall quality would be diminished. And if there was ever a time to push the quality envelop, it’s now.” “I’m thinking about introducing another label, in a more popular tier, something that could be sold in other environments, other channels. I’ve always been at the luxury end of the market, but I do buy other wines all the time, and think it would be great to get this new wine in more hands.” “So, how do I do this?”

The Plan

Yes, it is possible for a luxury brand to execute a lower priced, more egalitarian brand strategy effectively. A clear focus is needed and a tier specific brand plan is necessary. There are key questions that need to be asked and answered.

  1. Theme – name, appearance, label, packaging
  2. Personality – place, product, pricing, promotion
  3. Tactical Plan – what, when, where, how, how much
  4. Reputation Engineering – the PR initiative
  5. Sales Effort – DTC, DTT, existing distributors?

Forts de LatourA great team is in place, and to dislocate them for a new project just wouldn’t make any sense. They are part of the positive story for your existing brands and lend credence to the new project. You’re current cult and luxury portfolio is based on Napa Valley mountain grown Bordeaux proprietary reds. Protect the image of the existing luxury/cult brands by reducing production by further defining selection and maintaining real rarity. Use the traditional Bordelais classified growth second label model. Think Forts de Latour from Chateau Latour, Pavillion Rouge from Chateau Margaux, or Le Petite Cheval from Chateau Cheval Blanc. Share the story of replanting with new clones and the early quality displayed by the young vines, whilimages-3e refining the cult winemaking process. Increase exposure and the positive press and/or wine blog buzz opportunities by providing value and access to wines which were formerly unavailable in the broad market from your winery. In a market in which Michelin star chef Daniel Boulud has decided to focus more on value with DBGB Kitchen & Bar, the idea of a cult brand providing a more value centric model is not only timely, but most likely necessary given the reality of today’s world financial markets.

The Wrap

drafting plansCreating any new brand in a rapidly consolidating and saturated broad market is not without risk. Manage your risk by utilizing research to target the best potential accounts. Work with key lighthouse accounts, both on and off-premises in limited geographic markets, who will provide support through newsletter, blog and/or web endorsements, while avoiding brand image diminishing discounting. Be sharp in your pricing to not only maximize profit but to achieve planned depletion velocity and consumer pick-up and repurchase. Your value proposition is leveraged on your existing reputation, built through hard work and a fidelity to your singular vision over the last 15-20 years. Don’t engage in any activity that will diminish the new brand or your existing brands. And, really only do this if you are totally committed to success, and not just as a short term liquidity fix.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

It’s Time for Plan B

images-4“The most successful people are those who are good at Plan B.” … James Yorke

I’ll be more than happy to grant you a plenary indulgence if your first response to reading the daily news headlines is to head to your winery’s case goods storage facility to start drinking this years unsold suprplus. USA Today Money section headline reads ‘Anxietimages-3y surges as stocks relapse.’. The Wall Street Journal reads ‘Markets Fall on Growth Fears,’… ‘Drop Amid Worries Over Global Contraction.’ James C. Cooper in his Business Week column advises us that that ‘Consumers Won’t Drive A Recovery.’ Given the dynamics of today’s financial markets the world of commerce as we have known it appears, at a minimum, chaotic. The situation is completely out of our control, or so it seems. As our core wine consumers concentrate on increasing their rate of savings and focus on paying down debt, we face the daily reality of our wine business balance sheets. Upon the completion of the monthly review of our financial dashboards the question most often asked is, ‘which way out of the abyss?’ Well, I’m guessing that Plan A isn’t working as well as it once was, so let’s start talking about Plan B.

head in sandNo Plan B is not sticking your head in the sand, or drinking all of your unsold product by the holidays. Plan B is increasing your promotional spend in very specific ways to create improved brand awareness and to increase the velocity and lift of brand take-away. Promos can take many forms that can be shaped to your winery’s specific business and channel models. It is important to note the obvious. In the domestic USA there are 50 states, with each state determining alcoholic beverage custom, law and practice within its borders. Before embarking on any of the following suggestions make sure that you interface with your compliance specialist and with your Sonoma Market Wine Displaybeverage industry attorney concerning any proposed promotional activity. Promotions in the beverage business can be experiential, interactive, viral or mobile, while focusing on your tasting room, retail distribution or restaurant activity. The idea is to create a reason or a set of compelling reasons that with create a positive interaction between your brand and your targeted customer. Good promotions not only engender sales, but are also structured to provide trackable metrics. All good promotions are established with specific goals and objectives in mind. And all effective promotions are keyed to a calendar with a beginning and end date.

Thanksgiving w/WineAn awareness of the calendar is also important in maximizing promotional opportunities around key selling dates — Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, St Valentine’s Day, Easter/Passover, Memorial Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day. Promotions can focus on seasonal releases such as Beaujolais Nouveau on November 15th, the May release of Rose, the late spring release of your aromatic whites, or the fall release of your Syrah. Promotions can be keyed around major sporting events through sponsorships or seasonal promotions such as the MLB All Star Game or the annual NCAA/NFL season kick-off.

While general marketing trends follow our traditional Julian Calendar please note that the promotions calendar for all 50 states should not the sameimages. While consumers are drinking lots of wine in the Hamptons right now, the same can’t be said for most of Florida or Arizona where consumption peaks during the winter months. You may want to create a national promotions calendar, but you would be wise to regionalize your calendar based on seasonal differences and on your unique product mix.

Case Study

The Crisis:

Winery A, a <10,000 case single brand burgundian varietal facility, had experienced reduced week day traffic in the tasting room, IMG_0452and week-end spend was flat compared to last year. A significant amount of bleed was being experienced from the mailing list. The marketing plan had always been to focus broad market three-tier distribution specifically on-premise, and to not focus on retail, avoiding discounting and direct competition with, what was until this year, a vibrant DTC program. Well, restaurant sales were contracting and retail, while receptive, only placed just in time orders. Winery A’s distributors were also minimizing orders and stretching out the payment cycle on purchases, crimping cash flow in a tight, tight credit market. Ouch! What to do?

Plan B:

In order to create focus and to drive traffic in the tasting room the understanding that most traffic was now local was key to creating the following promotional activities. A technology person was hired and tasked with new web-site development and new media strategies. Online coupons were developed offering twofer tastings. The tasting bar glassware was upgraded to Stolzle lead freeBurgGrand crystal. Instead of the standard sequential individual glass tasting, flights of 3 wines were created, i.e., 3 Chardonnays, 3 Pinot Noirs, or 3 SVD wines. Retail wine pricing was revisited and prices were rationalized to current BBQeconomic realities. With the clarification that California wineries could now offer for on-site consumption full bottle or wine-by-the-glass sales, the outdoor areas were refurbished and replanted, picnic tables were added and activities such as live music, BBQ’s and association events were added to the Calendar. An outreach to mailing list clients was initiated first by email, and then by phone. A members only room was created and made available for for active mailing list customers. Several mailing list first only small production single vineyard wines were produced and marketed to the members. Principals and winemakers were now present and active at all primary members events.

To launch the new image, prior to the start of season, a regional party was thrown for hospitality staffs at other wineries, IMG_0543restaurants and hotels. A one day employee discount offer was put into place, and the In-Out Burger Wagon was brought in to serve the large crowd. The new media manager had a station for Facebook Fan Page sign-ups, tied into a ‘guess-that-varietal’ contest, with the winner(s) broadcast on the Fan Page the next day. Great good will was created, leading to a significant uptick in referrals from the attending hospitality folks. Next the new media manager organized individual tastings with traditional media Facebook Fan Sign-Upfrom local and regional newspapers, radio, television and the major wine magazines for a winemaker tour and tasting of the new releases. This resulted in several stories and reviews. Next came the tweetup. All visiting and local active Twitter contacts were invited to the winery for a tasting and BBQ. Library, and yet to be released wines were poured alongside current or soon to be released wines. A good time was had by all, and considerable buzz was created, not just on the event day, but the relationships developed kept the conversations flowing. The new media manager also identified key influential bloggers in targeted markets, and distributed samples for a subsequent online winemaker led tweetup.

For the broad market a new channel strategy was put into place. A regionalized marketing/promotion calendar was developed. The sample budget was increased, and a program for new accounts and/or new markets was put into place. The release of Winery A’s Brown Bag Wine Tastingbest Pinot Noir was treated as a notable event. Tastings were organized and the prize Pinot was placed in a brown paper bag as was a well known and highly rated and much more expensive Burgundian Pinot Noir from the same vintage. The targeted on-premises account gatekeepers were tasted on both wines in a random order, and then asked to choose. A win win situation that resulted in new placements in conjunction with new on-premise post-off or 3 case tier restaurant pricing replacing the former no discount practice. This tasting was replicated with the in-market distributor partner’s key account sales teams. In the evening, accounts with an active wine bar crowd imageswere sampled by the market manager interfacing with wine friendly patrons, and a wine amuse bouche was offered to receptive dinners. Retail pricing was revisited and post off or volumetric discounts were offered. In markets where groceries sales were allowed, distribution was extended with appropriate pricing creating sales and display activity even at Winery A’s higher price points. Winemaker and principal travel was coordinated to do either in-store tastings or bottle signings on key Friday and Saturday sales periods. And in the evening they were scheduled to conduct  local tweetups,  interacting with key wine bloggers and Twitter contacts.

In dealing with their distributor partners, Winery A allocated human resources, and promotional dollars to drive sales. In order to accelerate the payment cycle, they used a traditional CPG invoicing strategy. While seeming to lengthen the payment cycle, by writing the terms to reflect a discount of 5%/10 days, 2%/30,  & net 60, accounts receivable returned to a normalized payment schedule.


Woodcut BWinery A had a viable Plan B to attack not retreat from the market in times of consumer retraction. They created new promotions, programs and strategies reflecting new technologies, and allocated spend to position their winery for not only the current economic times, but for sustainable success. The implementation of Plan B which incorporated old school  promotional practices aligned with new technologies applied with old fashioned elbow grease have positioned Winery A for maximization of results. So, is your head still in the sand? Are you sitting on your barrels, mired in reams of financial reports, or are you working on Plan B?

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Satori in Sonoma

Studs Terkel“We are more and more into communications and less and less into communication” … Studs Terkel

My father instilled in me an innate curiosity about life and people. He taught me that having the right question may be more important than having all the answers. And most importantly he taught me to listen. I’ve always been interested in how people arrived at their career choices. Was it an accidental journey or a planned path that you’re now walking down. Since my life’s work has been in the wine business, I’m for the most part interested in people who have traveled a similar road. My Socratic style was inspired by Studs Terkel and his examination of the average American working stiff. When someone asks, ‘will there be anything else, sir’, I often respond question in question, “what’s the meaning of life?” This always stops the questioner in his/her tracks. A moment of reflection is sometimes given to a substantive response, but for the most part it often devolves into an embarrassed laugh, or worse into some platitude or other. Whenever I have the opportunity to talk with someone during a wine interaction I like to ask about their first memorable wine experience. What’s that? Well, since you’ve asked, I’m more than willing to share my story.

My father, Howard Corcoran was a character, and in the Irish oral tradition told great stories. He graduated as the Valedictorian from Central Catholic High School in Wheeling, West Virginia and then from West Virginia University with a degree in Law. He never sat for the bar, but instead followed his widowed Aunt Margie to Florida, where she was the business manager for the architect Addison Mizner. His aunt had been married to Arthur McConnaughy the founder of Island Creek Coal Company, the genesis company of what is now ConocoPhillips. My great Uncle was killed defending his mine during a strike, and Aunt Margie was Jerome KernleftBreakers Hotel Palm Beach with a then significant income. So off to Palm Beach with Dad to be near her sister Virginia, who’s husband operated the men’s haberdashery at the Breakers Hotel. Dad quickly landed a job for $1/day as a clerk in a brokerage office, and lived on a yacht owned by American composer Jerome Kern, with his roommate Johnny Love. At night Dad and Johnny headed a jazz combo that played during the high season at all the big parties. This was in the middle of prohibition, but the swells weren’t about to do with out their champagne or booze. My Dad and Johnny had a sideline business of also supplying the party favors. The yacht was used to sail over to Bimini to pick-up a load of Cordon Rouge Champagne, Seagrams whiskey, and Kennedy Scotch. And then the boys sold their haul to the social 400 who inhabited Palm Beach for the winter.

My Mom and Dad got married after the end of Prohibition just as the New Deal was helping to drag the economy out of the SCAN0009depression. I came along as the last of five kids towards the end of the famed boomer generation. I grew up listening to these by then romanticized stories, and knew that in some way, some how wine would be part of my life. My parents often had dinner parties, and Sunday meals were always formal sit downs at the long claw and ball foot table in the big dinning room. Wine was often part of these occasions, and we were always allowed to taste the wines and encouraged to share our impressions. Knowing my Dad’s story, I often asked my father’s friends and business associates about the first time that they thought of wine and went wow.

I still ask this question. I ask it of store owners, and clerks. I ask sommeliers, and chefs. I ask university professors, distributor owners and winery entrepreneurs. And everyone has an answer. That moment of enlightenment seems, while always different, to be a memory worth sharing. Although I grew up enjoying wine with my family in the appropriate social situations, my moment of zen came on theCh Pavie Label
Empress Lilly Riverboatbalcony of my Disney office in Florida tasting samples while creating the wine list for the Empress Lilly Riverboat restaurant complex at Lake Buena Vista Village. It was the mid 70’s and I was tasting the 1970 Ch. Pavie, and all of the sudden I got it. This, my moment of sudden enlightenment, was soon followed by a trip to Sonoma County, California. At the end of a long week I was sitting in my rental car on a cloudy, rainy winter day in the parking lot of the Dry Creek General Store sipping on a bottle of Dry Creek Vineyards Zinfandel. The sun finally came out from behind the dense clouds and a focused beam of light hit my car. At that moment, I knew that this was my home… satori in Sonoma.

Andre TchelistcheffThat my story, but what’s yours? I’ve been so fortunate due to the circumstances of my life and career to have asked this question of governors, congressmen,senators and CEO’s. I especially enjoyed asking this question of some of the icons in the wine industry, including Joe Heitz, Hans Kornell, Mike Girgich, Andre Tchelistcheff, Robert Mondavi, Henri Jayer, Jacques SeyssesJim Barrett, Warren Winarski and Jess Jackson. Their stories were all unique, but what great stories they were to hear. One of the best lessons that any successful wine salesperson can learn is to ask the right question and then listen to the answer. So, do your remember the moment when you first drank a wine and thought, wow? I‘m listening.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Back to Basics

Picaboo Street“When someone tells me there is only one way to do things, it always lights a fire under my butt. My instant reaction is, I’m gonna prove you wrong.” … Picabo Street

Yes, it’s tough out there, maybe tougher than anytime since the immediate post 9/11/2001 period for wine sales. The wine brand market place is saturated, with little or no room for additional undifferentiated brands. The rate of distributor consolidations has increased squeezing out the small winery brand. On-premises national accountNielsens are becoming an even more significant part of current broad market wine sales. There is an increasingly rapid consolidation of the grocery sector, constricting the funnel from winery to shelf placement. And, now the Nielsen Company, in their May 13, 2009 US Wine Consumer Report informs us that even though wine in general is ‘recession-resilient’ the US wine consumer has an economic hangover resulting in restrained spending.

US Wine Market GrowthThe domestic wine market, while featuring new points of price sensitivity and significant channel shifts, is still growing, albeit at a slower but perhaps more rational rate. Is the market growing for your brand? If not, maybe you should revisit some of the basics of marketing best practices. It will also help to have an understanding that the actions that you take today and tomorrow, will help to position your winery to ride upward with the recovery.

project-genomeDevelop a deep understanding of the various to market models available to you as a wine marketer:  the Three Tier System, DTT, and/or DTC. Gain a thorough knowledge of the role of ‘Marketing Agents,’ third party marketers of your wine such as The Wine Spies, Woot Wine, winecliQ, and soon Amazon, Sears and Borders Books, plus a panoply of independent wine clubs.

Hire and retain talent. Find people who share your vision, and have the ability and desire to articulate this to the market. Identify individuals who view innovation as a key strategy. It seems to be an important concept in this phase of the business cycle to have experienced leaders who have previously weathered the inevitable exigencies of  business ups and downs.

Run a flat organization. Create an environment of opportunity. Stress collaboration over hierarchy, and value and reward individuals based on their contributions. And, remember the golden rule of management, to praise in public, and to discipline in private.

Steve JobsRecognize that in recession it’s time as Steve Jobs of Apple once said to, ‘Think Different’. Apple was born in the energy crisis of the late 70’s. The early 1980‘s were a time of great innovation. Glen Ellen and ‘fighting varietals’, Kendall-Jackson’s category leading Vintners Reserve Chardonnay, and Corbett Canyon 1 Ltr varietals from Santa BarbarBadit Tetra Pack Winesa County all debuted in a climate of 22% interest rates and base mortgage rates of 17%. The early 90‘s brought about $2 Buck Chuck, Tetra Packs, Screw Caps, and Cult Cabernets. There has been a continual evolution of the wine market from deserts, to light sweet whites, to the era of jug wine, through the shift to varietals. The current cover of Beverage Industry Magazine features a story about packaging innovation, proclaiming a new ‘French Revolution, Boisset Family Estates pushes the boundaries of wine perception.’

permission marketingPay attention to cultural and market dynamics. In this age of permission marketing, use all of the great social media tools to engage your friends, fans, customers and clients. Get online and in tune with social networking through Twitter and Facebook. Make sure that all of your print trade information is accessible through your web site, such as labels, product information sheets, sell sheets, press releases,file:///Users/johnncorcoran/Desktop/images.jpegacclaim, etc. Put your press kits on USB flash drives. USB drives are green, they can be recycled, the end user decides what’s important to print saving a tree or two, and the reduction in print cost can be significant.

wine tastingsGet on the road and shake hands. No one can tell your story with more authenticity than you can. Do a lunch with market movers each day. If you’re in the market for 2 days, make the first lunch with 10 accounts who don’t buy your wines, the second day can be the thank you lunch for your best in-marketDavid Cole accounts. Get on the phone and talk to your customers. I saw this on Twitter 2 days ago from David Cole of James David Cellars “Surprised a few customers today when I called to thank them for their online orders. Love talking with customers!”

Jay Conrad LevinsonBecome as Jay Conrad Levinson counsels a ‘Guerrilla Marketer.’ Drive your DTC business by innovative marketing. Taste and interact with college alum groups. Do luncheon tastings for faculty groups, i.e., the Stanford faculty tasting. Set-up tasting lunches in large brokerage offices. Do tech company events. The following email announcement is a great example of a must do wine tech event hosted by Smoke Wallin, founder of Wine 2.0:

Subject: Announcement from Wine 2.0 – the second, exclusive, Wine 2.0 Reserve @ Google Event

500-600 Google professionals will attend. Very Casual/Relaxed, Outdoor on theJ. Smoke Wallin patio of the Cafe on Campus
. When: June 19th, 2009, 
Times: 4:00 – 6:30. 
Cost: $325 per winery to pour. 

Winery must be signed up on to register. Wineries must register who will pour for them in advance.

 Limited to first 25 wineries. RSVP to join us or with inquiries to

Invest in research tools, and get to know your market. For wines in broad market distribution, whether in a three tier model or a DTT model, wine market intelligence is key to decisions regarding your channel strategy, pricing tactics, and distribution model. Marketing intelligence isn’t just for the mid and large sized wineries. It may be as important to the 5,000 to 25,000 case producer, where these decisions are key to surviving and thriving in today’s congestion. All classes of CPGs utilize market intelligence, and there are specific products and companies that provide information to the wine industry.

IRI provides transactional web based data reports for wineries in chain beverage, or in US Food and Drug retail markets, utilizing empowering technology to focus on market performance and brand building

TradePulse provides comprehensive sales, distribution and inventory management services, critical information for managing your sales model.

Nielsen Retail Scan Data provides a robust reporting engine on current transactional data from the retail chain marketplace. Provides information on what are you selling and where are you selling. This is important as a tool for checking your strongest and your weakest markets.

WINEDATA Pricing Report is a source of competitive supplier pricing. This is important in helping to determine your brand and/or varietal competitive frame, and for tracking pricing tactics and promotional activity within this frame.

Christian MillerFull Glass Research is an independent firm providing primary wine industry marketing research operated by Christian Miller. This firm helps you choose the right methodology for your budget, by separating the nice to know issues from the important to know issues. A key component to understanding market dynamics necessary to making those important decisions.

MKF Research, founded by Vic Motto, is now headed by Christian Hill, and is a division of Frank Rimerman, Co LLP. MKF Research has done primary market studies on varietal and category pricing, ranking markets by varietal, and tracking pricing segment shift patterns. This is an aid in determining your market distribution model.

Joe MontanaHopefully your goal in the wine business is to build market value. This is your passion. You do this because you must. Really, because it’s nose to the grindstone time. Basically you need to work harder and smarter than your competitors. It is not the time to cut back on core business resource allocations, either human or capital. Use these resources to identify and fill distribution voids. And, remember to pay attention to the basics.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.