Revisiting Wine Marketing 101

Leo Burnett“If you don’t get noticed, you don’t have anything. You just have to be noticed, but the art is in getting noticed naturally, without screaming or without tricks.” … Leo Burnett

Chicken Little

Yes indeed, the sky may be falling. The Great Recession, which in the 6 months from September 2008 through March 2009 stripped in excess of $6.6 trillion from USA personal wealth, may be with us for awhile. The access to credit that drove US consumer spending behavior and the economy has largely evaporated. Although consumers have paid down debt at aiDepression Bread Lines coming soon to your neighborhood record pace, banks continue to reduce credit availability, expecting to retract an additional $1.5 trillion by lowering home equity loan access, consumer credit card limits and commercial lines of credit, restricting the ability of the US economy to recover recent spending patterns. Something lost in the swirl of marketing images from luxury Paneri Watchesconsumer brands such as Panerai Watches, Hasselblad, Hermes, Ferrari, Tom Ford, Christian Louboutin, Michael Kors, et alia, is that under the aura of glitz America has been on sale for quite sometime. Just like disco, to many consumers the idea of the luxury brand may be dead, at least for the foreseeable future. Value has coexisted with the concept of brand as long as brand has existed. It’s the yin and yang of the retail continuum. Walmart created explosive growth in the 1990’s with the concept of everyday low prices, and then created significant competition to chain grocers with the introduction of consumables in both Walmart and Sam’s Club stores. Costco has been in the game for awhile, and has become a major factor in wine sales. Target introduced the idea of designer products at value pricing, and now will match Walmart pricing toy for toy this Safeway Cut Case Wine Display w/Sale pricingChristmas. And then there’s Amazon. Amazon is no longer just your bookstore, but now a major online retailer across several categories of consumer goods and electronics. And, as soon as the compliance situation, delayed by the well documented situation at New Vine Logistics, can be sorted Amazon will be a major factor in wine sales. Trader Joe’s introduced the concept of healthful foods at value pricing back in the 1970’s. With the latest US Labor The Economic Elevator's going SouthDepartment statistics pegging the jobless rate at 9.8%, this is a dramatic understatement of the now real number that’s closer to 17% including people no longer actively looking for work and those now underemployed and working non-benefited minimum wage part-time jobs. It’s not surprising to see major retailers and grocers follow a strategy of value pricing. For anyone in this neck of the woods if you’ve been in Safeway recently the major merchandising theme is SAVE, and the yellow sale tags are inescapable. Lucky stores are following their philosophy of everyday low prices. And overriding this is a spirit of the new consumerism. It’s now cool to be frugal and save money.

The New Wine Consumer

San Francisco TrafficAs I worked my way to the Mission Street Garage traffic slowed to a crawl, in part due the rerouting of traffic away from Market Street. I was in the process of doing a NorCal broad market survey of grocery and independent package stores for a privately held family winery client, and it was time to break for lunch. Since my last two stops were in SoMa, I was headed to the food court in the Westfield Center, and to Charles Phan’s ‘Out the Door.’ Even though it was only 12:30 on an early October Friday, the joint was jumping. The food court was packed with shoppers, most holding multiple bags. The noise level sounded, well actually felt, like a low roar, creating a sense of excitement not present in the City’s shopping Out the Door at the Westfield Center, San franciscodistrict for several years. One of my early retail lessons at Disney’s Lake Buena Vista Village, was to look for the bags in shoppers hands as an indicator of a good or bad day, and this looked like a good day. All of this economic activity seemed to be driven by the aggressive mark-downs and clearances in the stores in the Center. Pricing motivated by the need to make room for holiday merchandise, and these pricing strategies seemed to be working. Consumers have been on the sidelines, even during the recent back to school shopping period in August. But sharp advertising and in store media seemed effective at getting shoppers to reopen their wallets. The efficacy of the various campaigns will be reflected in each stores daily flash reports. The tide may be turning, however slowly, as consumer sentiment seems to be Inflection Point Graphdriven by value, with the economic thermostat having obviously been reset. An economy that now seems more driven by consumer needs rather than by wants. And the need for value seems to be paramount as a new inflection point in consumer purchasing behavior has been reached. So, in an age of cash for clunkers, extended unemployment benefits and tight credit what can we do as wine marketers to meet the contemporary challenges of the market. Let’s take a quick revisit to the basics of consumer packaged goods marketing (I’ll try not to be too wonky) by first asking the following questions:

  • Who are the buyers?
  • How much will the buyers pay for my wine?
  • Where and how will the buyers purchase my wine?
  • How do I create buying situations?
  • Is the customer happy after purchasing my wine?

Marketing 101 Revisited

  • Product – the want satisfying offering of your winery (branding, packaging, product features)
  • Price – what you charge for your wines. Price is a measure of value. Price in the marketplace is a rough measure of how your consumers value your wines
  • Promotion – the communication of information between your winery (the seller) and the potential buyer in a defined channel (Place) that tends to influence attitudes and behavior
  • Place – making goods and services available in the right quantities and locations when your customers want them, resulting in the transfer of ownership from producer (your winery) to your customer/client, taking into account strategies and tactics applicable to any middlemen, brokers, marketing agents, wholesalers and retailers

Wine Business Monthly Top #0 US Wine CompaniesToday most wineries are micro marketers. Even wineries in the WBM Top 30 approach the market on a segmented basis. Micro marketing is the ‘performance of activities that seek to accomplish an organization’s (your winery) objectives (selling your wine on a timely basis) by anticipating customer or client needs (marketing research) and directing a flow of need satisfying goods (your wines) from producer (you) to customers/clients’ (via DTC, DTT, broad market).

It is important to understand that we are no longer in a wants period of aspirational or conspicuous consumption, but in period of meeting the specific identifiable needs oAbraham Maslowf your targeted audience. Without entering the maze of Abraham Mazlow’s ‘hierarchy of human needs,’ here are the basic definitions of wants and needs and demands:

  • Wants – desires for specific satisfiers of deeper needs; i.e., the particular choices (including types of products/specific brands) that consumers aspire to buy to satisfy perceived needs.
  • Needs – a state of felt or real depravation of some basic satisfaction (the difference between a consumers actual condition and their desired condition).
  • Demands – wants for specific products that are backed by an ability and willingness to pay for them.

Wine Consumers at Benziger WinerySo, as wine marketers it is important to understand that we don’t create needs. Needs preexist marketers and their brands. A marketers function is to influence wants. A good marketer takes the initiative in stimulating and facilitating commerce. A key part of this function is understanding the market and your consumer. So, how can one identify the best possible markets, and then influence consumer purchasing behavior? Engage your marketing research resources and ask:

  • Who are the people with identified wants?
  • Where are these people?
  • What’s their purchasing power?
  • What’s their buying behavior?

Having asked and answered the above questions, what degree of market exposure do you want, or more importantly can support with your production, allocations and resources, human and capital?

  • Intensive (ubiquitous distribution for large production, enterprise wine companies)
  • Selective (by channel for mid-sized winecos, or for products within an enterprise wineco where price dictates targeted distribution)
  • Exclusive (small- family winecos with limited channel distribution, or luxury brands model)

Having now identified your market and your desired level of targeted distribution, what sort of consumer behavior response do you want to engender – routinized response behavior or adoptive response behavior?

Routinized Response Behavior – the regular selection of a particular way of satisfying a need. This is typical of low involvement purchases, generics or purchases motivated by price or perception of price.

Adoptive Response Behavior – the demand for a specific product that meets, on a regular basis, the hierarchy of needs of a buyer, and the continued ability to purchase your wine(s). This is typical of high involvement purchases, usually of products (wines) within a consumer’s brand set.

Sale tags on all the winesAs a marketer, if you plan to sell your wines in a saturated market based only on price, in essence creating a commodity and not a brand, in what has to be by nature a rapid depletion exit strategy, then the idea of routinized response behavior is the way to go, and pricing and display allowances will be your primary marketing tactics. However, if you want to build a brand even in this challenging market, then engage in marketing tactics that create adoptive response behavior within your identified consumer set.

Wine Consumer Adoption Process

Awareness – comes to know your wine(s) through your brand awareness plan that may include category specific magazine reviews, scores, story placement, newspapers, blogs, forums, and social media.

Interest – the ease of finding information on your web site, forums, blogs and traditional wine press. Events like Twitter Taste Live, open that Bottle Night or Tweet-ups.

Evaluations – providing information and access to your wine. In addition to the traditional wine press new points of information such as Cellar Tracker, AbleGrape, and approximately 800 wine bloggers are a resource that you need to identify and utilize.

Trial – the chance to try before committing. Wine by the Glass, in-store sampling, winery tasting rooms, winemaker dinners.

Decision – to adopt or reject. A whole set of modifiers come into play, such as varietal, pricing, packaging, where and when available to purchase.

Confirmation – the reinforcement that the decision is good. This can be in the form of availability or rarity, appealing to cultural values (sustainable or biodynamic wines), based on acclaim, reviews or a wine blog, or on the affirmation from friends or family.

The Game

Twins beat Tigers in one game playoff 2009Without a thorough grounding in classic CPG marketing fundamentals and a clear understanding of wine brand marketing concerning human motivations in regards to purchasing behaviors, success in today’s highly competitive and product saturated marketplace is not likely for your winery. This somewhat academic take, a departure from my usual ‘how-to’ articles was written to encourage you, your winery’s marketing officer, to think about your current brand plan. Concerning your brand – what is it that you do and why do you do it? Is it working? What would you do differently? What are you doing to differentiate your wines? It’s not a time for indecision in your consumer facing wine business. Faced with declining sales in his collection line Michael Kors quickly introduced a consumer approachable ready to wear line and is thriving in a brutal retail market. Yes, times are tough, and consumer behavior has been reset, but commerce moves on. It is important to be in the game, so sharpen your pencils and fire up your synapses. Preparation and planning = performance.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Yes We Can

Rosanne & Johnny Cash“The key to change… is to let go of fear” … Rosanne Cash

Change, Change, Change

Anyone who has lived through the last 3 years, has an awareness that in these transformative times fundamental social change has occurred. You were along for the ride whether you wanted to be or not. Oh, this isn’t the Woodstock Nation’s form of radical social change, or, even the Brown vs The Board ofBrown vs the Board of Education Education emotionally charged social change. In this current period symbols of change were not as visible. No long haired flower children in strange colorful clothes, no angry mobs, no Lester Maddox with his ax handle, and no burning Woodstock posterstreets. The agents of change fit-in as well as ‘The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit’ fit into his era. Most likely you woke up one day and saw that significant cultural change had occurred. Buried in the details of your daily existence, the greed and hubris of those that created the current economic conditions driving this period of change went largely unnoticed until the meltdown. The meltdown which hit as quickly and as surely as those planes hitting the TwinTowers on 9/11. And, as this was happening an evolution of just how it is we communicate concepts, ideas and beliefs rapidly evolved. Into the void stepped a political marketing machine whose brand plan was consideredChris Matthews News Sunday on MBC revolutionary, and was widely disregarded by most professional political pundits. It was an often repeated Sunday broadcast network news analysis that the candidate and his team using these new symbols and social media platforms had no idea what they were doing. And then came the Iowa Caucus. Without regard to your personal set of political beliefs, it seems to be obvious that you as a wine marketer should be studying the observable lessons of the Obama Presidential campaign marketing tactics and the campaign’s use of new media tools with the understanding that how we as wine MarCom managers now communicate and market brand has fundamentally changed.

A Short Case Study in Contemporary Brand Management

Barrack working the crowd on the Campaign TrailIn any brand marketing campaign, the essence and essential truths of the brand must be distilled into a viable message. The message must be replicated and repeated through the use of images, words and symbols. Through the message a visceral connection must be made between the brand and the targeted audience for success to be North Carolina Rally for Barrack Obamaaachieved. In an effort to achieve this success, through effective marketing research, the campaign was able to identify a target audience based on demographics and attitudinal predisposition. A significant portion of this identified audience had a presence on social media. The Obama campaign was an early adopter/implementer of social media platforms. MySpace was dominant in the social media space at the beginning of the campaign, and so an Obama fan page was created, and interested individuals rushed to join the club. As Facebook and then Twitter gained traction, accounts were created to engage voters, and as the Shepard Fairey's Barrack Obama 'Hope' posternumber of fans grew so did the channels for communication and a pool for fund raising was established. Individuals who contributed to the campaign were given an opt-in choice to receive important updates about the campaign and election. YouTube was also a major factor with numerous short videos featuring endorsements, narrative story lines and music like the Will.i. am. ‘Yes We Can’ video featuring the mantra of the ‘Change’ message for the campaign.Will.i.am, Yes We CanThe iconic Obama ‘HOPE’ poster was created by street artist Shepard Fairey, and became instantly recognized as the visual image of the campaign. Third party endorsements, utilizing the ideas of co-branding and borrowed interest, were achieved, with Oprah’s endorsement gaining worldwide press coverage for the Obama campaign. A masterful use of message, image, social media, endorsement and third party advocacy. There was significant push-back against this campaign, but the execution of an integrated brand management plan through the fidelity to the perceived authenticity of message, the engagement and involvement of the many, and a transparency of the process, insured the successful conclusion of stated goals. So, are you to going to mirror this model and move your brand(s) forward towards the adoption by your targeted audience resulting in purchase?

An Even Shorter Conclusion

writing a checkAs I stood in line at the local Safeway this morning the three customers ahead of me all paid by personal check, and I’m thinking ‘people still use checks?’ If you want to live on a cash basis, haven’t ATM cards been around all of our adult lives. This slow adoption of tools made available through technology, even in this technologically sophisticated area of the country, seems to be endemic in the marketing arena of the wine business. I’m not sure if this is ego, uncertainty, or fear of the unknown. But I am sure that those that are frozen by fear will likely not survive in these uncertain economic conditions, or have afrozen in fear chance of thriving in a turnaround. Given the vision allowed by the distance of time and with my apolitical marketing mind-set, I can see the clarity of vision of the Obama presidential campaign, and their effective use of all the current tools available to even wine marketers. Ones that are available for use without the necessity to build a war chest on the scale of a political campaign. Difficult times should light the fires of our creative marketing imaginations. At this time in history, we have to be thinking better, faster and cheaper. One of the key lessons to be learned is that ubiquity doesn’t trump authenticity. The basic idea that I’ve learned sometime in my marketing experience is that while political skills matter there are no magic bullets, or one size fits all solutions for today’s wine marketing challenges. But, identifying, targeting and engaging your consumer audience before, during and after the sale is essential, essential to conceiving and executing your winning wine marketing brand plan.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Video as an Effective Emotional Branding Medium

Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs“A brand that captures your mind gains behavior. A brand that captures your heart gains commitment.” … Scott Talgo, Brand Strategist

The challenges facing today’s wine brand marketer are daunting. In what brand communicator, Paul Wagner of Balzac Communications refers to as a saturated wine market, how do we communicate the passion to excel as evidenced by our vintner partners? How do we consistently maintain and elevate the real value of our brand(s) in today’s marketplaceSafeway wine set, everything is on sale? And, how do we create a community of passionate fans? Well, my observations tell me that the lessons that you memorized in marketing 101, and then actualized early in your careers as wine brand marketers – creating a positive consumer interaction, then consistently and credibly delivering an authentic brand message engendering trust and hopefully loyalty – have not changed. But, the methods incorporated and the mediums utilized in this age of permission marketing certainly have accelerated brand evolution, and reshaped the ability of wine marketers to consistently maintain message and elevate inherent brand value.

Don Draper, Emotional BranderVideo as a tool in brand marketing kits has been around for a long time, since the golden age of television changed how the Mad Men utilized emotional branding. But that was in a time of 3 networks and low resolution TV signals received by antenna, and shown on sets limited by CRT’s and tube technology. Now we live in a world of flat screen multi-media receivers featuring 3-400 channels delivered via cable or satellite, increasingly in an HD format. We all have our iPhones, smartphones, net books,and laptops connected to the ether of the internet via wifi or laptop broadband connect cards. FlipHD cameras have becomLisa filming Keth Hock w/FlipHD at Keefer Vineyarde ubiquitous, and the new iPhone 3G-S is capable of recording video and sound. Consumers are empowered to capture and then replicate images through YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Vimeo. As a marketer desiring to incorporate innovative best practices as part of your integrated wine brand marketing tactics, it would behoove you to not only be aware of and master contemporary and evolving video technologies, but to observe others in wine biz marketing incorporating video as an effective emotional branding medium; and then, within the culture of your wine business mirror the most successful applications utilizing consumer driven video applications to deliver and hopefully maximize the dissemination of your core message.

Carl SaganVideo to effectively make a connection with our, as Carl Sagan describes, reptilian brains it must maximize emotional impact through the use of images, sound and narrative. Story matters, even more in a visual medium. Story always matters. We, as consumers, have developed keen message filters, accepting some messages, disregarding others as junk mail, or sending many directly to the trash as cynical exercises in marketing voodoo. The narrative often determines the tenure of the video, and the visuals tend to follow the story. Although, Diane Ackerman advises that “the visual image is a kind of tripwire for the emotions.” And, Scott Bedbury of Nike and Starbucks states, “Great brands taps into emotions. Emotions drive most if not all of our decisions. A branSteve Jobsd reaches out with a powerful connecting experience. It’s an emotional connecting point that transcends the product.” “A great brand is a story that’s never completely told. A brand is a metaphorical story that Blake Mykoskie of TOMS Shoesconnects with something very deep. Stories create the emotional context people need to locate themselves in a larger experience.” Within the context of wine brand marketing, to make this connection with and to make an imprint on our limbic brains, the story needs an inherent legitimacy, and needs to exhibit a ‘realness,’ to create emotional brand capital with the power to translate experience and awareness into action (purchase). Your goal in this saturated wine marketplace is to create a compelling brand identity, by using your whole marketing tool chest, including video, and by creating an emotional connection between your brand promise and your targeted set of consumers…and, then delivering on that promise. Some examples of this are Steve Jobs at Apple, Blake Mycoskie at TOMS Shoes, and now, within our own wine industry, Wilson Daniels Films.

Wilson Daniels FilmThrough luck and circumstance I had the opportunity this past week to follow Bret Lyman, of B-Napa Studio, and Lisa Mattson, of Wilson Daniels Films , shooting the Schramsberg Documentry , and to post tweets in real time documenting the Documentary. Having had the chance to interact with Lisa Mattson,Lisa Mattson w/ToxBox at Wine 2.0Wilson Daniels Director of Communications, at two Taste Live events, an Earth Day teleconferencing session with Bernard Lacroute of WillaKenzie in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, and Nigel Nigel Greening of Felton RoadGreening of Felton Road in New Zealand’s Central Otago, and observing Ms Mattson’s TokBox live online discussions with Australian winery Owner Grant Burge at this Spring Wine 2.0 event at Crushpad, SF, I knew that Lisa gets it. This is someone that industry should be watching and mirroring. Whip smart, professional, accomplished and with a work ethic that is unmatched, I knew that this would be a good shoot. The bonus was local B-Napa Studio Principal and Director of Photography Bret Lyman, who first came into focus with the wine marketing community with his award winning film “CRUSH” for Don Sebastiani & Sons. Although a local Napa Valley kid, Bret migrated to New York City to work in the production of commercials, where he earned his chops in production and editing.

The Schramsberg Documentary crew at Standish Vineyards, Anderson ValleyMaybe it’s the big city experience or the Malcom Gladwell 10,000 hours to competence theory, but working with these two, Lisa as Producer, and Bret as cinematographer, editor and visual story teller provided another take on the creative process. I’ve often said, I don’t know all the answers, just most of thSchramsberg Documentry Grip Holding Tree Branch for Bret Layman shote questions. On a ride back from the shoot in the Anderson Valley, I asked about Bret’s background helping with framing the shoot. His response was on-point that although he’s a commercial editor/producer by training, his foundation is as an ‘emotional brander.’ And although there was a scene schedule outlining the shoot, Bret, reinforcing my experience with the creative process, said the scenes revel themselves as he shoots.Watching these two pros function as a unit at each location was another lesson in getting the job done correctly. And yes the resulting thought-provoking visuals were revealed as part of the process. This wasn’t a video being shot, but a real film shot by consummate professionals, capturing the visceral images and rich details at each location.

Lisa Mattson Slatting the shot for Bret Lyman at Juster, Anderson ValleyMy emotional connection with Schramsberg goes back to my days at Disney when I was promoted out of food & beverage and assigned responsibility for Village Wine & Spirits. I knew that I had to differentiate the shop to be successful. One of my plans was a wall of Methode Champenoise wines. Schramsberg was my first domestic sparkler and my best seller. It didn’t hurt that President Nixon took Schramsberg to China on his visit tKeith Hock & Lisa Mattson in Juster Vineyard Filming Schramsberg Documentaryo establish detente. Since my Disney days, I’ve visited Schramsberg on several occasions, but over these two days I had unfettered access to the backstory of people and place. Riding from Sonoma up to Mendocino’s Anderson Valley with Keith Hock, I was able to ask any question that I wanted, and was surprised to learn that he sourced 92 separate vineyards in multiple appellations in the Napa/Carneros, Sonoma Coast, Marin Coast, and Mendocino/Anderson Valley AVAs for Schramsberg. And these are not just any vineyards. In Anderson Valley we stopped at Juster, and Standish, and had a meeting with Paul Ardzrooni, Schramsberg’s Anderson Valley Vineyard Manager, in the Savoy Vineyard. After lunch at Underwood, where Keith reveled that he was a professional bike racer who lived for a period in France Keith Hock, Schramsberg Winemaker checking the Pinot in Keefer Vineyards, Green Valleyriding in races such as the famed PariBret Lyman & Lisa Mattson shooting Schramsberg documentary in Keefer Vineyards Roubaix, we headed to the Green Valley and the Keefer Vineyard. Watching Keith walk around through the vineyard, looking at the fruit, I noticed that his eyes lit up like the Sebastiani Theater marquis at dusk. He was at home and in his element. Then off to the wilds of the Sonoma Coast and the Saltonstall Vineyard, where the grapes shared space with the wind, the fog some sheep and a white border collie that keep between the film crew and his flock. The light faded before we had a chance to continue to the Hyde/Carneros location. BTW: these aren’t any vineyards, but vineyards that supply fruit to some of the most revered Chardonnay and Pinot Noir still wine producers in Northern California. Great wine takes great fruit, and with these sources Schramsberg’s quality is assured.

Riddler, Ramon Viera scene set-upDay two of the shoot was at the winery. I’ve been around wineries for the last 25 years, and there are certain cues that I observe that tell me the real story. First are the grounds, then the cellar, then bottlinBret Lyman filming shoot positioning at Jack's Block of the J Davies Estateg and most importantly the people. I came away impressed. And as I’ve said before I’m somewhat jaded. I was impressed from the start, first with Scooby of Rios Vineyard Management, to Marketing Manger Matt Levy, to Ramon Viera, the world’s fastest riddler. What I liked best when I asked Ramon about Hugh Davies, he replied that ‘Hugh is one of us.’ There’s a cultural context to what Ramon said. Hugh is respected as the boss, but this respect is reinforced by his not setting himself apart from his team. Great Hugh Davies at Schramsbergcompanies, and great wineries are the work of a team. This is a lesson that we must learn as marketers. The best wines come from an emotional connection by the team. If we can visually convey this, then our customers will bHand Labeling J Schrame part of that connection. I can’t wait to see the finished Schramsberg Documentary film from Bret and Lisa. I know it’s going to be good. When I left, Bret and Lisa were still filming, so, Bret posted the last scene shot that day on my Facebook wall, a long view of a Schramsberg cave tunnel. He said he dreamed of the shot the night before, This almost obsessive attention to detail, the philosophical mindset of this filmmaker, the creative intuition and passion displayed in B-Napa’s earlier work for Wilson Daniels Films, and the ability to draw out that essential visual narrative in consort with Lisa is so important to the ’emotional branding’ inherent in this 2 year long documentary process.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

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Is The Medium the Message?

Marshall McLuhan“Obsolescence never meant the end of anything. It’s just the beginning.”
… Marshall McLuhan

The opening talk by Paul Wagner of Balzac Communications at the recent kickoff meeting at the St. Helena based CIA’s Rudd Center of the reenergized Academy of Wine Communications was filled with promise.Academy of Wine Communications Promise tempered by concern. Concern that the world of winery public relations was changing, and it was changing fast. How we all communicate our messages and to whom is in a state of flux. Our own local major urban newspaper, The San Francisco Chronicle is the canary in the coal mine when it comes to wine coverage. While the articles and reviews are still top flight, the once dedicated wine section no longer makes economic sense in a world where news, reviews and information availability is ubiquitous anywhere where there is an internet connection. Having been around for awhile, I’ve discovered that change is good for the soul. It’s adapt or perish. Old dogs can and must learn new tricks.

aka Bistro, St HelenaToday at lunch in St. Helena, I couldn’t help but notice the number of smart phones, netbooks and laptops that were visible and in use. The discussion of the decay of manners in American society is a topic for another’s blog, but the use of technology is here and it’s how we now talk with each other. Technology enables how we get and filter our daily information. My invitation to lunch was in the form of a text message sent from a client’s Blackberry to my iPhone, and my response was in kind. We both knew several people in the crowded room, so after the check was paid, we took the opportunity to network. Networking in the old school sense by shaking hands and swapping stories. My host became involved in a longer conversation, so I thought I would do some market research. Alaptop keyboard couple from South Africa was teleconferencing with their winery staff on their MacBook Air laptop. The honeymooners from Florida were posting pictures of their lunch on Facebook for their friends and family back home. The young women from the New York distributor, on an educational trip to the Napa Valley, were documenting lunch and the local wine choices on their company blog. The local vineyard owners were texting details of their luncheon deal back to their CFO. The room was abuzz, and the restaurant was mentioned to countless contacts around the States and around the world.

Reading the NewspaperIt is an incontrovertible fact that we are in an age of permission marketing. Consumers choose what message or marketing centric handshake to accept. We have to ask and answer the question as to what now works, and how do we track the metrics of Public Relations success in this new, new world. How can we still control the substance and intent of our brand messages? Do the number of mentions and the old circulations numbers still function as the measure of success? And, if now, what about tomorrow? The rise of social media and the conversations of wine bloggers, wine forums and the active wine community on Facebook and Twitter are in fact being tracked by Cruvee. Batchbook, a small company contact manager CRM has developed a social media interface that allows registered users to read what their clients are saying on social media networks about their brand(s). Salesforce.com, the cloud CRM application has added a module offering clients the abilitytwittering to listen and interface with their customers on Twitter. So, it is now possible to initiate communications initiatives within specific targeted communities and then track and document the specific resultant metrics via Cruvee, or the appropriate hosted CRM. I happen to think this is more accurate and more effective than a review or a story in a classic metropolitan newspaper, where the accepted metrics were, in my opinion, perhaps more nebulous, by tracking insertions and assuming circulation numbers equaled reads. Of course the numbers won’t look as good, but we are now actually narrowcasting to an identified set of wine consumers rather than broadcasting. If we do this in a limited set of markets, then an ROI can be established by tracking the effect on wine sales within the defined geographies over a 30 day followup period.

Rutherford GrillTraditional CPG best marketing practice must carry the day without regard to the communications medium utilized. In a conversation at the Rutherford Grill,after the AWC meeting and reception, with two giants in winery PR, Jim Caudill and Tim McDonald it was agreed that times have changed, but that the basics have remained the same. The story to have value and to create interest must be unique,Jim Caudill replicable, visceral and verifiable. There must be an objective beyond just awareness. It has to be about managing your winery and your brand(s) reputation. Specific objectives for your communications program must be established and objective points of achievement must be tracked. Action without accountability is likely devoid of merit. Key communication points must be defined and repeated as part of your winery message throughout all tiers, all channels and all outlets. Listen to the pros, incorporate their ideas, and you’ll be effective in achieving your planned programs.

Inconsistency just doesn’t work in winery PR. In my time in the ether of social media, I have witnessed some egregious breaches Twisted Oak Signof sound public relations communication principles. Making the effort and then bailing seems to be worse than not making the effort at all. To be effective in your social media or traditional media engagement efforts it is important to be interesting, consistent, honest, transparent, and personable. The feedback from those in the know is that the format for conversation has changed, the rules of interface have changed, but the idea of

Jug Shop Pinot Days Promotionbest practices remain.There are many wineries and wine shops that do this job well: Twisted Oak, Hahn, St. Supery, The Jug Shop, Domaine547, Winery Collective, Walla Walla Wine Woman, and of course Bin Ends Wine, founders of Taste Live, to name a few. Hahn and St Supery have established the role of social media management as a key winery functional area. With the advent of the the Really Goode Job promotion, the industry has had the opportunity to identify a number of very talented individuals on Murphy-Goode’s bank. It is my fervent hope that many or most of these individuals, finalist or the overqualified, are offered wine industry PR positions.

In spite of the spate of current conversations and all of our observations of old media hand wringing, traditional print media is not yet dead. Perhaps they’re under the weather with a serious case of where are we now introspection. Each week in my iMac mailbox I receive an update from Wine Opinions listing wine reviews and stories that have been printed in major urban USA newspapers. Wine Opinions has also recently identified key wine bloggers and listed key stories covered in this emerging universe. Anyone in the wine business  who has worked with or talked to a wine distributor sales person in current times understands the functional role of reviews. Good to great reviews raise the awareness of your winery or brand with the first line of gatekeepers, and function as virtual key masters unlocking access to the market. So, don’t throw away or demean this still important point of market information.

Imagine How Others Would Do ItI’ve had the opportunity recently to interface with some real wine industry public relations pros and integrated communication wine marketers: Lisa Adams Walter of Adams Walter Communications; Michael Wangbickler of Balzac Communications; Victoria Bunch, former HP PR executive, and Tia Butts of Benson Marketing Group. The individuals in this group along with the aforementioned Jim Caudill and Tim McDonald will help you identify and craft your brand message and act as pilots to assist in navigating your winery through the now churned waters of wine business communications. Remember that Marshall McLuhan advised us that “it’s not the medium it’s the message.”

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Swimming the Grocery Channel

Larry Bird“Push yourself again and again. Don’t give an inch until the final buzzer sounds.”
… Larry Bird

The Client

I’d been listening for more than a hour, taking notes, watching for signs or cues that my client wanted more than a confirmation that the strategic business model conceived more than 7 years ago was still viable in this new, emerging economy. Sometimes it’s just best to let someone talk and talk. And after all the points are expressed, restated and then exhausted the steam just runs out. As my client turned in his chair, at images-3the large cluttered antique desk, holding the latest account sold report, he looked at me and said one last time, ‘just a little more hard work.’ ‘Yep, that’s what we need, a little more hard work.’ I leaned forward in the faded leather club chair, pinching my eyes closed with my thumb and forefinger and started to feel the onset of a migraine. A migraine that would only go away when my client saw the light. I fought back the urge to answer withDana Carvey as Bush 1 my best Dana Carvey imitation of Bush 1 saying “Not gonna do it.” But, self preservation and 7 years of history got the better of me, and I responded that it was time to rethink the winery’s business model. We needed to flatten out the growth curve of the principal brand, while continuing to focus on the best quality. Some of the juice would have to declassified to be sold in bulk, bottled as a value tier or launched as a new brand. If the new tier or label strategy were to be implemented then pricing tactics would allow the winery to open up new channels for wine by the glass (WBTG), independent retail, or grocery distribution. The word grocery resonated like a scratch on a blackboard. My clients face scrunched-up as if he had just smelled a carton of month old milk. He looked up at me over the top edge of his bifocals and said ‘GROCERY?’

The Grocery Channel

I understand your reticence. You’re concerned with endangering, what Tim McDonald CSW refers to as, your winery’s ‘Reputation Engineering.’ And, based on old models, this concern was once justified, but no longer. Today’s grocery is more than a viable constellation solar winerydistribution alternative for wineries of small and moderate size. The world of grocery distribution seems to the uninitiated to be dominated by the big boys, the 30 largest wineries in the USA market. And it seems to be most appropriate as a channel model only for those wineries producing 100,000 cases or more. Well the grocery market, like the wine market is highly differentiated and segmented. Groceries are classified and merchandized by neighborhood and product selections determined by local demographics. A sharp, regionalized well conceived channel strategy is a must. There is a spot across most price points somewhere within the grocery segment for your wine brand(s). There are convenience store concepts, independents, mid-chainKrogers, large regional multi-unit stores, and then there’s Safeway and Krogers. Within these larger grocery brands several regional sub-brands keyed to the needs of their local markets exist. Consolidation, a current trend in the adult beverage business for producers and distributors, has also found its way into the US Food & Drug business segment. It is not a one-size fits all solution anymore. As I look across the country, I see data that demonstrably reveals pricing segment shifts and channel shifts that favors due consideration of grocery distribution for your brand(s). I believe that it’s time to reset your expectations. It’s time to innovate. It’s time to realize that there are new points of price sensitivity that factor into consumer wine purchase decisions. It certainly is time to recognize the need for real-time category information as a key part of your decision making matrix.

Please note that large areas of the country, including the Inter-Mountain West, several control states such as Pennsylvania, and Whole Foods Wine Sectionlarge US Eastern population centers including Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts don’t as yet allow wine sales in grocery stores. For the smaller, niche, highly-differentiated winery single unit independents and mid-chains are the most appropriate targets for selected distribution. In the nine county San Francisco Bay Area, the small and mid-chain grocery market is vibrant. Within 100 miles of most wineries in Napa and Sonoma several points of potential distribution exist. Although not meant to be comprehensive, the following list represents strong premium grocery retail wine locations: Oliver’s, Fiesta/Pacific, Molsberry Market, Sonoma/Glen Ellen Markets, Vallerga’s, Ranch Market, Sunshine Foods, Oakville Market, Dean & Deluca, Molly Stone’Nugget Markets Wine Sections, Paradise Foods, Nugget Markets, Real Foods, Andronico’s, Berkeley Bowl, Monterey Market, Farmstead Cheese, Draeger’s, Lunardi’s, Cosentino’s, Diablo Foods and many more. Whole Foods, and Trader Joe’s are also larger specialty food retailers with strong wine programs, and a significant Bay Area presence. Although, I’ve focused on my back yard, I would also target strong local or regional grocers such as the Carolina’s Harris Teeter, Chicago’s Treasure Island, Seattle’s Metropolitan Market, Portland’s New Season’s Markets, Los Angeles metro area Gelson’s and Bristol Farms, Florida’s Publix Markets, Texas’ Central Markets, Arizona’s AJs, Cleveland’s Heinen’s and St. Louis’ Dierberg’s.

A Very Short Course in Category Management

Category Management GraphCategory Management is “a retailer/distributor/supplier process of managing categories as strategic business units, producing enhanced business results by focusing on delivering consumer value.” …FMI ECR Committee

Selling to groceries can seem daunting to the first timer. The concept of management by objective is key to your grocery presentation. What specifically are your goals? How do you hope to achieve your placements? Do you understand how to leverage your brand equity with that of the retailer’s equity? You don’t have to be Gallo or K-J to have definedTrader Joe's goals and a plan. Your brand’s equity is based on your prior distribution achievement, sales history, reliability, pricing and promotions. Understand that this is a business relationship that requires candor, confidentiality, participation and the ability to give unbiased recommendations in reference to the category, varietal and other winery’s products. Wineries of all sizes have the ability to grow and diversify their depletions by taking the category management approach with retailers seriously. Understand that retailers are seeking multiple points of input to get a holistic view of their marketplace. Use your unique position as a smaller winery and your knowledge of the super and ultra-premium price segments to become a trusted adviser helping the grocery buyer to be better at focusing on the end user. In your presentation be objective, be consumer oriented, keep the message simple and focused, be action specific, and sell a ‘win-win’ program.

A very simple analysis is to quantify your opportunity  by comparing the Consumer Development Index and your Business Fine Wine SalesDevelopment Index, What may sound like geek speak to you, is actually a simple concept. CDI is a specific market accounting of the % of sales for an item based on type and price. To access this information you need to refer to data from IRI, Nielsen, Trade Pulse, or other previously discussed wine consumer insights firms. BDI is your actual % of sales within a defined geography. Select markets where CDI>BDI. Calculate the gap as CDI-BDI = a positive opportunity. Then utilizing the formula (Volume/BDI)*Gap = opportunity volume, develop a plan. This is allows you to ask and discover the answers to the 3 basic questions of distribution:

  1. Where are we?
  2. Where should we be?
  3. How do we achieve desired targeted distribution objective

Swim to Win

imagesSelling wine to groceries tends to be a more technical and specialized arena than other available wine sales channels, but not necessarily more complex. Sales is sales. My Dad used to always say ‘sales is a contact sport.’ And in any contact sport you want the best tools in order to just not survive but to succeed. You’ll need to incorporate your market, brand and wine knowledge, salesmanship, business skills and your entrepreneurial mind set. Yes, it’s tough out there, always has been, always will be. But, you’re in the game to win. And if you close your mind to any available channel before a thorough strategic market analysis, win you won’t. As you swim in the grocery channel, utilize technology to access the best market and category information tools to target, prepare, present , close and win.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

It’s Time for Plan B

images-4“The most successful people are those who are good at Plan B.” … James Yorke

I’ll be more than happy to grant you a plenary indulgence if your first response to reading the daily news headlines is to head to your winery’s case goods storage facility to start drinking this years unsold suprplus. USA Today Money section headline reads ‘Anxietimages-3y surges as stocks relapse.’. The Wall Street Journal reads ‘Markets Fall on Growth Fears,’… ‘Drop Amid Worries Over Global Contraction.’ James C. Cooper in his Business Week column advises us that that ‘Consumers Won’t Drive A Recovery.’ Given the dynamics of today’s financial markets the world of commerce as we have known it appears, at a minimum, chaotic. The situation is completely out of our control, or so it seems. As our core wine consumers concentrate on increasing their rate of savings and focus on paying down debt, we face the daily reality of our wine business balance sheets. Upon the completion of the monthly review of our financial dashboards the question most often asked is, ‘which way out of the abyss?’ Well, I’m guessing that Plan A isn’t working as well as it once was, so let’s start talking about Plan B.

head in sandNo Plan B is not sticking your head in the sand, or drinking all of your unsold product by the holidays. Plan B is increasing your promotional spend in very specific ways to create improved brand awareness and to increase the velocity and lift of brand take-away. Promos can take many forms that can be shaped to your winery’s specific business and channel models. It is important to note the obvious. In the domestic USA there are 50 states, with each state determining alcoholic beverage custom, law and practice within its borders. Before embarking on any of the following suggestions make sure that you interface with your compliance specialist and with your Sonoma Market Wine Displaybeverage industry attorney concerning any proposed promotional activity. Promotions in the beverage business can be experiential, interactive, viral or mobile, while focusing on your tasting room, retail distribution or restaurant activity. The idea is to create a reason or a set of compelling reasons that with create a positive interaction between your brand and your targeted customer. Good promotions not only engender sales, but are also structured to provide trackable metrics. All good promotions are established with specific goals and objectives in mind. And all effective promotions are keyed to a calendar with a beginning and end date.

Thanksgiving w/WineAn awareness of the calendar is also important in maximizing promotional opportunities around key selling dates — Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, St Valentine’s Day, Easter/Passover, Memorial Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day. Promotions can focus on seasonal releases such as Beaujolais Nouveau on November 15th, the May release of Rose, the late spring release of your aromatic whites, or the fall release of your Syrah. Promotions can be keyed around major sporting events through sponsorships or seasonal promotions such as the MLB All Star Game or the annual NCAA/NFL season kick-off.

While general marketing trends follow our traditional Julian Calendar please note that the promotions calendar for all 50 states should not the sameimages. While consumers are drinking lots of wine in the Hamptons right now, the same can’t be said for most of Florida or Arizona where consumption peaks during the winter months. You may want to create a national promotions calendar, but you would be wise to regionalize your calendar based on seasonal differences and on your unique product mix.

Case Study

The Crisis:

Winery A, a <10,000 case single brand burgundian varietal facility, had experienced reduced week day traffic in the tasting room, IMG_0452and week-end spend was flat compared to last year. A significant amount of bleed was being experienced from the mailing list. The marketing plan had always been to focus broad market three-tier distribution specifically on-premise, and to not focus on retail, avoiding discounting and direct competition with, what was until this year, a vibrant DTC program. Well, restaurant sales were contracting and retail, while receptive, only placed just in time orders. Winery A’s distributors were also minimizing orders and stretching out the payment cycle on purchases, crimping cash flow in a tight, tight credit market. Ouch! What to do?

Plan B:

In order to create focus and to drive traffic in the tasting room the understanding that most traffic was now local was key to creating the following promotional activities. A technology person was hired and tasked with new web-site development and new media strategies. Online coupons were developed offering twofer tastings. The tasting bar glassware was upgraded to Stolzle lead freeBurgGrand crystal. Instead of the standard sequential individual glass tasting, flights of 3 wines were created, i.e., 3 Chardonnays, 3 Pinot Noirs, or 3 SVD wines. Retail wine pricing was revisited and prices were rationalized to current BBQeconomic realities. With the clarification that California wineries could now offer for on-site consumption full bottle or wine-by-the-glass sales, the outdoor areas were refurbished and replanted, picnic tables were added and activities such as live music, BBQ’s and association events were added to the Calendar. An outreach to mailing list clients was initiated first by email, and then by phone. A members only room was created and made available for for active mailing list customers. Several mailing list first only small production single vineyard wines were produced and marketed to the members. Principals and winemakers were now present and active at all primary members events.

To launch the new image, prior to the start of season, a regional party was thrown for hospitality staffs at other wineries, IMG_0543restaurants and hotels. A one day employee discount offer was put into place, and the In-Out Burger Wagon was brought in to serve the large crowd. The new media manager had a station for Facebook Fan Page sign-ups, tied into a ‘guess-that-varietal’ contest, with the winner(s) broadcast on the Fan Page the next day. Great good will was created, leading to a significant uptick in referrals from the attending hospitality folks. Next the new media manager organized individual tastings with traditional media Facebook Fan Sign-Upfrom local and regional newspapers, radio, television and the major wine magazines for a winemaker tour and tasting of the new releases. This resulted in several stories and reviews. Next came the tweetup. All visiting and local active Twitter contacts were invited to the winery for a tasting and BBQ. Library, and yet to be released wines were poured alongside current or soon to be released wines. A good time was had by all, and considerable buzz was created, not just on the event day, but the relationships developed kept the conversations flowing. The new media manager also identified key influential bloggers in targeted markets, and distributed samples for a subsequent online winemaker led tweetup.

For the broad market a new channel strategy was put into place. A regionalized marketing/promotion calendar was developed. The sample budget was increased, and a program for new accounts and/or new markets was put into place. The release of Winery A’s Brown Bag Wine Tastingbest Pinot Noir was treated as a notable event. Tastings were organized and the prize Pinot was placed in a brown paper bag as was a well known and highly rated and much more expensive Burgundian Pinot Noir from the same vintage. The targeted on-premises account gatekeepers were tasted on both wines in a random order, and then asked to choose. A win win situation that resulted in new placements in conjunction with new on-premise post-off or 3 case tier restaurant pricing replacing the former no discount practice. This tasting was replicated with the in-market distributor partner’s key account sales teams. In the evening, accounts with an active wine bar crowd imageswere sampled by the market manager interfacing with wine friendly patrons, and a wine amuse bouche was offered to receptive dinners. Retail pricing was revisited and post off or volumetric discounts were offered. In markets where groceries sales were allowed, distribution was extended with appropriate pricing creating sales and display activity even at Winery A’s higher price points. Winemaker and principal travel was coordinated to do either in-store tastings or bottle signings on key Friday and Saturday sales periods. And in the evening they were scheduled to conduct  local tweetups,  interacting with key wine bloggers and Twitter contacts.

In dealing with their distributor partners, Winery A allocated human resources, and promotional dollars to drive sales. In order to accelerate the payment cycle, they used a traditional CPG invoicing strategy. While seeming to lengthen the payment cycle, by writing the terms to reflect a discount of 5%/10 days, 2%/30,  & net 60, accounts receivable returned to a normalized payment schedule.

Conclusion:

Woodcut BWinery A had a viable Plan B to attack not retreat from the market in times of consumer retraction. They created new promotions, programs and strategies reflecting new technologies, and allocated spend to position their winery for not only the current economic times, but for sustainable success. The implementation of Plan B which incorporated old school  promotional practices aligned with new technologies applied with old fashioned elbow grease have positioned Winery A for maximization of results. So, is your head still in the sand? Are you sitting on your barrels, mired in reams of financial reports, or are you working on Plan B?

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

Focus on Blocking and Tackling

200px-Pat_Riley“When you’re playing against a stacked deck, compete even harder. Show the world how much you’ll fight for the winners circle. If you do, someday the cellophane will crackle off a fresh pack, one that belongs to you, and the cards will be stacked in your favor.” … Pat Riley

During Monday’s NBA Finals game 3 something seemed off with Kobe Bryant. His focus just wasn’t there. ThisKobe Bryant usually isn’t the case. Kobe is arguably one of the top 10 professional basketball players of all time. His skill set is matchless, and usually so is his focus. Needless to say, the Lakers lost. We’ve seen this lack of focus in sports before with the Pens’ goalie Fleury in last week’s NHL game 5 at the Joe, or with pitcher Barry Zito most of last year at the Phone Booth. It seems that a key observable attribute among those that succeed in any endeavor is the ability to focus on the task at hand. Focus that is the culmination Kennethfoxof awareness, preparation and execution. As a matter of course the wine business entrepreneur is often pulled in multiple directions, and in place of the necessary laser like focus on the end game these distractions tend to diffuse one’s original vision. In observing this situation, a former associate who prior to his life in the wine business was a senior US Navel officer was fond of saying that ‘a good Admiral always knew the outcome of the battle before sailing from port.’ So, like good admirals we should all have a thorough understanding of our brand positioning, and the strategy and tactics necessary for the competent and successful execution of same on the road to winery viability.

Without regard to a specific channel model, understand that you are in the wine distribution business. This is just the process by which your wine gets to the final consumer. This includes the selling, shipping, merchandising and promotion ofWine trade tasting your wine. In performing these functions it seems important to understand the unique and individual needs and wants of each and all of your customers – sales agents (including distributors), trade and consumers. It also requires an understanding of the marketplace and your competition. It is through the acquisition of this knowledge that leadership is developed in crafting quality products that fill the needs and wants of your targeted audience. Being a visionary in anticipating your future opportunities will allow you to continue achieving your brand goals. But, in order to shape your brand success you’ll need to identify, create and communicate your winery’s unique brand position.

Small to mid-sized wine companies need a keen awareness of the perceived attributes that determine their brand positioning. For Cabernet Sauvignonexample, where your wine grapes are planted, and the set of geological, geographical and cultural attributes inherent to this point of origin go a long way to the determination of positioning – i.e., take the vineyard location of Cabernet Sauvignon. While Cabernet Sauvignon’s organoleptic profiles, without regard to origin, share some similar characteristics, the point of origin provides some significant points of differentiation as to brand positioning. Cabernet wines grown in Napa Valley will tend to be positioned differently thaimages-7n Cabernet wines from Bordeaux, or even neighboring Sonoma; and, certainly on a different tier than the good Cabernets grown in Monterey’s Hames Valley or in the nearby Paso Robles AVA. Consider the unique brand position that Ste Michelle Wine Estates achieved for Washington State Cabernets. All of these are different but potentially good wine regions, but each is perceived to have a unique sets of attributes by critics and consumers alike. And these attributes tend to aid in directional decisions concerning volume, price, and channel, hopefully resulting in consumer take away.

images-8For those brands in broad market distribution, whether in a DDT or a three tier model, there are three basic questions to ask and answer:

Where are my wines now sold?
Where should my wines be sold?
How do my wines achieve desired targeted distribution?

Effectively answer the above inquiries and you’ll be worth every penny of your income aspirations. In other words, define the current state of affairs and establish brand goals. Yes, this is detailed work, but without targets, goals, and a foundation of specific in market knowledge, your house of cards is in danger of crumbling. So, roll up your sleeves and create an effective CRM list of targeted accounts, by market (geography), name, class (volume potential) and type (on or off-premise). The broad market is dynamic, so continually modify, maintain and update your CRM database.

Now that you have this baseline brand distribution intelligence, your future sales efforts should be directed towards increased markePalace Kitchen Seattlet penetration in your now targeted account universe. Goals should be established within each designated sales territory by account and varietal. Target specific goals should also be codified and achievement should be tracked. These targets, for example, could be wine list or WBTG placements in New American cuisine restaurants in Seattle, Portland and San Francisco. Or, fine wine retail placements and ads in Boston, New York, and D.C. Your case goods volume, price point, product mix, and brand intelligence will help to determine this market specific distribution strategy.

Focus

FocusThis is how the top 30 largest wineries tactically achieve their success. They do this in all their key markets. While it’s almost always a good idea to observe and mirror other successful wine businesses, you’re going to have to be more focused and crisper in your execution. You’re a much smaller business and your wines are at FOBs that exclude certain points of distribution. Take advantage of your unique brand positioning proposition. Focus your efforts on fewer markets. Perhaps look to hotels such as Four Seasons, or Ritz Carlton or Kimpton Hotels, and not just wine list or wine by the glass, but in addition pursue placements in banquets and events. Country Clubs and private clubs are an under serviced account base,  but once established they tend to be long-term loyalty accounts and their members represent a key demographic base of influencers. Some of my brands most sustainable distribution was achieved in private clubs, common in most major metropolitan markets. By the way, caterers are always looking for differentiated wines.  So, put on your game face and become a focused niche marketer. Focus on your execution, and focus on scoring those winning placements.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.