Observations of a Wine Marketer – Taste Napa Valley

“If all of us acted in unison as I act individually there would be no wars and no poverty. I have made myself personally responsible for the fate of every human being who has come my way.”
….Anais Nin

Thoughts & Observations

The events that started in October 2008 seemed like the start of trip down the wormhole. As the economy spun out of control due to the hubris, fraud and greed of a few in whose hands the future of financial markets rested, our wine industry started to take on water in the ensuing world financial turbulence as outlined by Michael Lewis in The Big Short,” As brands attempted to gain traction, the strategic and tactical marketing sins that were ignored in the halcyon days of the apparent financial boom of the post 9/11 world, were now acting like anchors helping to sink a lot of wine boats. Wineries found that they were facing non-existent or greatly constricted credit-markets. Bulk & case goods values were realistically lowered as the rate of depletions declined, and inventories started to back-up, crowding distributor and winery warehouses. Brand margins were squeezed as significant discounting became the de rigueur marketing tactic to move lazy inventories. In this fabric of the late first decade of the new millenium’s space time continuum, results were at best mixed. The market disequilibrium lacked known values, resulting in a confusing set of solutions; and not ones satisfying the given equation. It seemed that in the singularity of the broad market no one solution existed to pull our industry out of the gravitational force of this financial black hole.

However, conventional wisdom and the popular press tends to focus our view of market trends through the lens of our largest or enterprise winecos, or through those wineries with the most visible profiles. This prismatic look exhibits the logical fallacy of ‘argumentum ad numerum,’ (i.e., the number of followers sways the argument, arguing noise over signal) and on closer view leads us down a path of absurdity. Most USA wineries are family wineries, producing less than 10,000 cases with a significant number producing less than 5,000 cases on an annual basis. We don’t need Stephen Hawking to solve this apparent size dichotomy; but, we just have to observe what it was that allowed some agile family winecos to escape the event horizon and to have thrived in these trying times.

  • market research
  • a passion for wine
  • sharp pricing tactics
  • a laser-like focus on quality
  • significant channel diversity
  • client relationship development
  • a clear route to market strategy
  • key lighthouse account placement
  • indy and mid-chain grocery distribution
  • communicating real points of differentiation
  • incorporating a vibrant DTC & DTT sales plan
  • focus and delivery of superior customer service
  • website development that allows for intuitive eSales activity
  • utilizing regional and/or national restaurant account targeting
  • adopting integrated sales-focused drinks industry CRM technology

There has been an apparent turn-around in the wine market, starting in mid-August of 2009. This has been true especially for wines above $20/bottle. But, there will be bumps and plateaus in the road ahead. In the opinion of Think Wine Marketing the three-tier distribution system presents significant challenges for small family wineries, and the support of HR5034 by three-tier wholesalers is a serious affront to family winery/distributor relationships. So, those lessons adopted and/or observed during the Great Recession should not be shelved as we approach a brighter business climate. Let’s not do this time warp again.

Taste Napa Valley

As always events large and small hosted by the Napa Valley Vintners are events not to missed, and Taste Napa Valley 2010 exceeded all expectations. The air was heavy, almost tropical, and the skies were dark, but spirits were high and smiles were everywhere – on the faces of staff, volunteers, chefs, vintners and guests. The early start and the iconic winery location marked a change in the public face displayed by Napa Valley to guests from the four corners of the wine world. This was a return to the sprit that I remember that was in place back in the early days of the Napa Valley Vintner get-togethers, the ones hosted by Hans Kornell. While the food, wine and celebrity meter was off the hook, this was just a gathering of Napa Valley’s agribusiness business community shared with wine consumers for the benefit of numerable Napa County non-profits. If the positive results of this year’s earlier Napa Valley Vintners’ Annual Mid-Winter Barrel Auction for the Trade, were to replicated at the Auction Napa Valley 2010, a good indicator was the Friday June 4th Barrel/eAuction at the Rubicon Estate. There seemed to be a palpable excitement displayed by the more than 2,000 attendees at the grand courtyard food and wine tasting, and the active bidding for the Barrels by ballot or though the eAuction was robust. Incorporating a mix of technology for the eAuction was timely and displayed a recognition that eCommerce now plays a key role in the wine business and at contemporary wine auctions. But a large part of the auction was the interaction of guests with names or faces previously only seen by most visitors in print, on TV or on the web. Those who live here often forget that not only do we live in one of the most beautiful places in the world, but the people we see in our everyday work lives… the ones who work so hard in our restaurants and wineries are in fact celebrities. And these celebrities of the food and wine world were cranking out good times, good will, great food and great wines.

There were so many good wines to try, and so little time. I read recently somewhere that Napa Valley winemakers should forget about trying to make Sauvignon Blanc. Well,besides the ludicrous nature of those comments, two memorable Sauvignon Blancs that I had a chance to try were the Araujo Eisle, and Farella-Park . After sharing a Glass of the 2003 J Schram with my friends at Schramsberg, I headed to the caves with about 1,500 new friends for tastes of Blackbird, Cornerstone, COHO, J. Davies, Oberon, Rubicon, Shafer and on and on. My preliminary impression of the 2008 Napa Valley reds based on about 15 separate barrel samples, is that at this point in their evolution they’re displaying density of flavor, saturation of color and impeccable balance. Can’t wait until these wines hit the market.

The Wrap

What follows are some excerpts from Think Wine Marketing’s conversations with winemakers and vintners at Auction Napa Valley: Since the first of the year market conditions have improved significantly and that results have returned to a new normal. Consumers, ones who always had the ability to spend on affordable luxuries are now willing to do so. Encouraging news supporting a strong rebound for Napa Valley wines is that more than a few small family wineries reported being sold-out of their current releases. I was also told that lessons learned in the past 2 years will be incorporated into sales and marketing strategies going forward. I also heard that the stresses encountered in the marketplace brought home that we are all just farmers, growing, making and marketing wine to people on a one-on-one basis. Perhaps my favorite conversation was with a passionate vintner and member of the Auction Napa Valley steering committee. We talked about the journey through the Great Recession to the current recovery – “it was all about the journey, and not about the end-point.”

My take away from Taste Napa Valley and Auction Napa Valley 2010 is that those of us in the wine business should be proud to work with people who realize that involvement in the greater community in which they live and work is a privilege to be exercised. Auction Napa Valley 2010 proceeds are reported to be $8.51 million, a 49% increase over the 2009 results. Kudos to the efforts of the Napa Valley Vintners, Rubicon Estate, Meadowood, the volunteers, vintners, chefs and bidders for such spectacular results.

Copyright © 2010 Think Wine Marketing Blog® All rights reserved.

Revisiting Wine Marketing 101

Leo Burnett“If you don’t get noticed, you don’t have anything. You just have to be noticed, but the art is in getting noticed naturally, without screaming or without tricks.” … Leo Burnett

Chicken Little

Yes indeed, the sky may be falling. The Great Recession, which in the 6 months from September 2008 through March 2009 stripped in excess of $6.6 trillion from USA personal wealth, may be with us for awhile. The access to credit that drove US consumer spending behavior and the economy has largely evaporated. Although consumers have paid down debt at aiDepression Bread Lines coming soon to your neighborhood record pace, banks continue to reduce credit availability, expecting to retract an additional $1.5 trillion by lowering home equity loan access, consumer credit card limits and commercial lines of credit, restricting the ability of the US economy to recover recent spending patterns. Something lost in the swirl of marketing images from luxury Paneri Watchesconsumer brands such as Panerai Watches, Hasselblad, Hermes, Ferrari, Tom Ford, Christian Louboutin, Michael Kors, et alia, is that under the aura of glitz America has been on sale for quite sometime. Just like disco, to many consumers the idea of the luxury brand may be dead, at least for the foreseeable future. Value has coexisted with the concept of brand as long as brand has existed. It’s the yin and yang of the retail continuum. Walmart created explosive growth in the 1990’s with the concept of everyday low prices, and then created significant competition to chain grocers with the introduction of consumables in both Walmart and Sam’s Club stores. Costco has been in the game for awhile, and has become a major factor in wine sales. Target introduced the idea of designer products at value pricing, and now will match Walmart pricing toy for toy this Safeway Cut Case Wine Display w/Sale pricingChristmas. And then there’s Amazon. Amazon is no longer just your bookstore, but now a major online retailer across several categories of consumer goods and electronics. And, as soon as the compliance situation, delayed by the well documented situation at New Vine Logistics, can be sorted Amazon will be a major factor in wine sales. Trader Joe’s introduced the concept of healthful foods at value pricing back in the 1970’s. With the latest US Labor The Economic Elevator's going SouthDepartment statistics pegging the jobless rate at 9.8%, this is a dramatic understatement of the now real number that’s closer to 17% including people no longer actively looking for work and those now underemployed and working non-benefited minimum wage part-time jobs. It’s not surprising to see major retailers and grocers follow a strategy of value pricing. For anyone in this neck of the woods if you’ve been in Safeway recently the major merchandising theme is SAVE, and the yellow sale tags are inescapable. Lucky stores are following their philosophy of everyday low prices. And overriding this is a spirit of the new consumerism. It’s now cool to be frugal and save money.

The New Wine Consumer

San Francisco TrafficAs I worked my way to the Mission Street Garage traffic slowed to a crawl, in part due the rerouting of traffic away from Market Street. I was in the process of doing a NorCal broad market survey of grocery and independent package stores for a privately held family winery client, and it was time to break for lunch. Since my last two stops were in SoMa, I was headed to the food court in the Westfield Center, and to Charles Phan’s ‘Out the Door.’ Even though it was only 12:30 on an early October Friday, the joint was jumping. The food court was packed with shoppers, most holding multiple bags. The noise level sounded, well actually felt, like a low roar, creating a sense of excitement not present in the City’s shopping Out the Door at the Westfield Center, San franciscodistrict for several years. One of my early retail lessons at Disney’s Lake Buena Vista Village, was to look for the bags in shoppers hands as an indicator of a good or bad day, and this looked like a good day. All of this economic activity seemed to be driven by the aggressive mark-downs and clearances in the stores in the Center. Pricing motivated by the need to make room for holiday merchandise, and these pricing strategies seemed to be working. Consumers have been on the sidelines, even during the recent back to school shopping period in August. But sharp advertising and in store media seemed effective at getting shoppers to reopen their wallets. The efficacy of the various campaigns will be reflected in each stores daily flash reports. The tide may be turning, however slowly, as consumer sentiment seems to be Inflection Point Graphdriven by value, with the economic thermostat having obviously been reset. An economy that now seems more driven by consumer needs rather than by wants. And the need for value seems to be paramount as a new inflection point in consumer purchasing behavior has been reached. So, in an age of cash for clunkers, extended unemployment benefits and tight credit what can we do as wine marketers to meet the contemporary challenges of the market. Let’s take a quick revisit to the basics of consumer packaged goods marketing (I’ll try not to be too wonky) by first asking the following questions:

  • Who are the buyers?
  • How much will the buyers pay for my wine?
  • Where and how will the buyers purchase my wine?
  • How do I create buying situations?
  • Is the customer happy after purchasing my wine?

Marketing 101 Revisited

  • Product – the want satisfying offering of your winery (branding, packaging, product features)
  • Price – what you charge for your wines. Price is a measure of value. Price in the marketplace is a rough measure of how your consumers value your wines
  • Promotion – the communication of information between your winery (the seller) and the potential buyer in a defined channel (Place) that tends to influence attitudes and behavior
  • Place – making goods and services available in the right quantities and locations when your customers want them, resulting in the transfer of ownership from producer (your winery) to your customer/client, taking into account strategies and tactics applicable to any middlemen, brokers, marketing agents, wholesalers and retailers

Wine Business Monthly Top #0 US Wine CompaniesToday most wineries are micro marketers. Even wineries in the WBM Top 30 approach the market on a segmented basis. Micro marketing is the ‘performance of activities that seek to accomplish an organization’s (your winery) objectives (selling your wine on a timely basis) by anticipating customer or client needs (marketing research) and directing a flow of need satisfying goods (your wines) from producer (you) to customers/clients’ (via DTC, DTT, broad market).

It is important to understand that we are no longer in a wants period of aspirational or conspicuous consumption, but in period of meeting the specific identifiable needs oAbraham Maslowf your targeted audience. Without entering the maze of Abraham Mazlow’s ‘hierarchy of human needs,’ here are the basic definitions of wants and needs and demands:

  • Wants – desires for specific satisfiers of deeper needs; i.e., the particular choices (including types of products/specific brands) that consumers aspire to buy to satisfy perceived needs.
  • Needs – a state of felt or real depravation of some basic satisfaction (the difference between a consumers actual condition and their desired condition).
  • Demands – wants for specific products that are backed by an ability and willingness to pay for them.

Wine Consumers at Benziger WinerySo, as wine marketers it is important to understand that we don’t create needs. Needs preexist marketers and their brands. A marketers function is to influence wants. A good marketer takes the initiative in stimulating and facilitating commerce. A key part of this function is understanding the market and your consumer. So, how can one identify the best possible markets, and then influence consumer purchasing behavior? Engage your marketing research resources and ask:

  • Who are the people with identified wants?
  • Where are these people?
  • What’s their purchasing power?
  • What’s their buying behavior?

Having asked and answered the above questions, what degree of market exposure do you want, or more importantly can support with your production, allocations and resources, human and capital?

  • Intensive (ubiquitous distribution for large production, enterprise wine companies)
  • Selective (by channel for mid-sized winecos, or for products within an enterprise wineco where price dictates targeted distribution)
  • Exclusive (small- family winecos with limited channel distribution, or luxury brands model)

Having now identified your market and your desired level of targeted distribution, what sort of consumer behavior response do you want to engender – routinized response behavior or adoptive response behavior?

Routinized Response Behavior – the regular selection of a particular way of satisfying a need. This is typical of low involvement purchases, generics or purchases motivated by price or perception of price.

Adoptive Response Behavior – the demand for a specific product that meets, on a regular basis, the hierarchy of needs of a buyer, and the continued ability to purchase your wine(s). This is typical of high involvement purchases, usually of products (wines) within a consumer’s brand set.

Sale tags on all the winesAs a marketer, if you plan to sell your wines in a saturated market based only on price, in essence creating a commodity and not a brand, in what has to be by nature a rapid depletion exit strategy, then the idea of routinized response behavior is the way to go, and pricing and display allowances will be your primary marketing tactics. However, if you want to build a brand even in this challenging market, then engage in marketing tactics that create adoptive response behavior within your identified consumer set.

Wine Consumer Adoption Process

Awareness – comes to know your wine(s) through your brand awareness plan that may include category specific magazine reviews, scores, story placement, newspapers, blogs, forums, and social media.

Interest – the ease of finding information on your web site, forums, blogs and traditional wine press. Events like Twitter Taste Live, open that Bottle Night or Tweet-ups.

Evaluations – providing information and access to your wine. In addition to the traditional wine press new points of information such as Cellar Tracker, AbleGrape, and approximately 800 wine bloggers are a resource that you need to identify and utilize.

Trial – the chance to try before committing. Wine by the Glass, in-store sampling, winery tasting rooms, winemaker dinners.

Decision – to adopt or reject. A whole set of modifiers come into play, such as varietal, pricing, packaging, where and when available to purchase.

Confirmation – the reinforcement that the decision is good. This can be in the form of availability or rarity, appealing to cultural values (sustainable or biodynamic wines), based on acclaim, reviews or a wine blog, or on the affirmation from friends or family.

The Game

Twins beat Tigers in one game playoff 2009Without a thorough grounding in classic CPG marketing fundamentals and a clear understanding of wine brand marketing concerning human motivations in regards to purchasing behaviors, success in today’s highly competitive and product saturated marketplace is not likely for your winery. This somewhat academic take, a departure from my usual ‘how-to’ articles was written to encourage you, your winery’s marketing officer, to think about your current brand plan. Concerning your brand – what is it that you do and why do you do it? Is it working? What would you do differently? What are you doing to differentiate your wines? It’s not a time for indecision in your consumer facing wine business. Faced with declining sales in his collection line Michael Kors quickly introduced a consumer approachable ready to wear line and is thriving in a brutal retail market. Yes, times are tough, and consumer behavior has been reset, but commerce moves on. It is important to be in the game, so sharpen your pencils and fire up your synapses. Preparation and planning = performance.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.

CRUVEE Names Think Wine Marketing Founder to BOA

The Appointment

cruvee logoHaving written and proposed the adoption of a number of available useful technological advances for wine business marketing departments seeking to optimize their efficacy, I have an announcement to make concerning my recent involvement with one new wine business technology company. On August 13, 2009 I accepted an appointment  to the Board of Advisors at Cruvee. In this past week, Cruvee.com CEO Evan Cover named Michael Wangbickler and John Corcoran, Think Wine Marketing Founder and Chief Marketing Officer to the Cruvee BOA. As a wine industry participant, I have been a tireless supporter of the wine industry’s adoption of technology under the mantras of  ‘best practices’ and ‘utilize every tool available.’ I look forward to working with Evan, Michael and the BOA at Cruvee in an effort to increase the adoption of this timely and critical wine marketing intelligence platform.

As a note to new and regular readers

John Corcoran Think Wine MarketingAlso, having previously written about Social Media with occasional Cruvee mentions as part of the story line, I felt that I should update my readers regarding my new appointment to the Cruvee BOA. This seems important to me, and hopefully to you, the reader, within my personal ethos of transparency. Please also note that this is a quick post and that my regular weekly Think Piece article will be posted this Thursday Evening 8/20. So, staMargie Tosch (OTL), Russ Beebe (California Wine Hikes), Randy Hall (Wine Biz Radio)y tuned! The intent of any Think Piece post is an effort to create  a discussion revolving around identifiable current wine marketing issues. Your involvement and comments are a critical part of the process. This is meant to be a conversation and not a lecture. I’m gratified that to date I’ve received more than 250 comments in my first series of Think Pieces. Many of my post have been the result of ‘what-if’ questions from friends and contacts in the wine business, sometimes on the phone but often over a glass of wine, or possibly a local craft brew. Hopefully the content has been helpful to some, and of value to many, but that determination will be made by you, the reader. Please feel free to contact me by commenting on this blog, or please click on the blog contact page to call or email me directly. Looking forward to a robust discussion on the topics over the next  six months

The Cruvee PR Release

Pioneer in social media intelligence for the wine industry, announced today the appointment of two wine business experts to their Board of Advisors

08.13.2009 – Napa, CA, August 12, 2009 – Cruvee, the pioneer in social media intelligence for the wine industry, announced today the appointment of two wine business experts to their Board of Advisors (BOA) selected to assist and advise the company in strategic developments, marketing and outreach within the wine community.

Cruvee’s BOA will thoughtfully work to advance Cruvee as the leader in social media monitoring and information aggregation for all online conversations surrounding wine and wine brands. And in order to do so, Cruvee will look to these two recognized leaders and innovators in the wine industry to draw from their experience bolstering Cruvee’s mission and aspirations.

Founder and Chief Executive officer, Evan Cover, asserted, “It is an honor and absolute privilege to have these forward thinking wine business leaders as part of Cruvee. They bring so much passion and knowledge to our company that will undoubtedly aide in our success.”

The two initial appointees to the BOA are:

Michael Wangbickler is the Executive Director of the Academy of Wine Communications and currently holds the position of PR manager at Balzac Communications and Marketing in Napa, California. Prior to that he was at Franciscan Estates (part of Constellations Wines U.S.) where he was a wine educator/program specialist with responsibilities for trade relations and special events. His credentials include the Diploma in Wine & Spirits from the Wine and Spirits Education Trust, Sommelier Certificate from the Court of Master Sommeliers, and is a Certified Wine Educator. He has been a judge for various wine competitions, and has taught courses on wine and wine marketing.

John Corcoran is the Owner & Chief Marketing Officer of Think Wine Marketing where he works to assist wine businesses maximize market awareness through market modeling, strategic planning, promotions and digital strategic initiatives. John has been in the wine industry for over 25 years focusing on marketing and sales. He is an active voice online through his blog and social media participation, extending his reach as a well-respected resource for insights into wine business.

Cruvee’s BOA will consists of four total members. They will be announcing two additional members comprised of thought leaders and veterans within the technology industry soon.

About Cruvee

Cruvee is a customer acquisition vehicle that is designed for wineries to connect with consumers through social media monitoring services. It aggregates all the conversations and tasting notes from around the web including:

• Over 19 Million blog posts with over 1,000 dedicated wine bloggers

• Over 15,000 forums – both wine related and non-wine related

• Over 3 million tweets a day

• 100’s of social networking sites and wine groups

• Major wine related tasting note sites

This tool helps to promote and protect a wineries brand by effectively monitoring, measuring and interpreting the online chatter, clutter and its inherent viral effect. They help their clients leverage this consumer-generated media as a competitive advantage in today’s online marketplace. Cruvee not only gives wineries a unique view of their brands public perception in near real-time, but they also enable wineries to engage consumers to continue brand loyalty and sales efforts.

Note: Copyright © 2009 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved.