Haiti – Roshambo – The Winter Fancy Food Show – Wine Tastings

“Man should not consider his material possession his own, but as common to all, so as to share them without hesitation when others are in need.” … St Thomas Aquinas

Haiti

Referencing what is now a well publicized event, Palate Press Publisher David Honig announced the teaming of the online wine magazine with ‘Brother, Can You Spare a Bottle.’ Palate Press is asking the wine world to contribute that special bottle of wine from your cellar for an online wine auction, with 100% of all proceeds being contributed to the American Red Cross Haitian relief effort. The celebrity Hope for Haiti Telethon is over, and the star power of George Clooney and Brad Pitt have exited stage right. And, while the NFL has stepped up with a drive to raise funds for Haiti via cell phone texting, it’s now our industry’s turn to step up, and offer some of the best of our resources, as we often do.

Those of us who make our home on the west coast, know that but for luck, this could be us. We live with occasional shaky ground and the fortunately less frequent significant earthquake event. But unlike Haiti, which is the poorest of nations in the western hemisphere, those of us in the wine business know that sometimes part of our daily decision process is whether to have a Syrah or a Pinot with our roast Rocky Chicken, and not the Haitian’s constant plea of  ‘where can I find food or water today.’ It’s likely that, by the time this post is read, Think Wine Marketing’s donation of a 1.5L of 2004 Radio-Coteau Savoy Anderson Valley Pinot Noir will have been sold (and it has – thanks to Andy Demsky of Shafer Vineyards). So, thanks to those who not only bid at Palate Press on TWM’s lot #13, but on all of those who bid and to those who provided the most interesting selection of wine collectables for this unfortunately necessary outreach. However, there still are many terrific lots in the auction catalog for your consideration, and it’s not too late to submit your own bottle(s) for bid. TWM’s view is that this isn’t a hand-out, but a hand-up to those who are now most in need of assistance.

Roshambo

The Santa Rosa Press Democrat recently ran an article covering the closure of Rashambo Winery and the subsequent withdrawal of Naomi Brilliant from the wine business. It is an interesting read, but to me this is a story of the career redirection of one individual and not a symptom of a wider wine industry systemic financial failure. What follows is a comment by Think Wine Marketing made as part of the conversation at Alder Yarrow’s Vinography thoughtful analysis in his article “Marketing and Branding Do Not a Winery Make.”

TWM: “Thanks for the cogent POV re another wine business closure. I don’t see the Roshambo case to be an example of a canary in the coal mine. A wineco’s economic sustainability in today’s economic and cultural environment, in reality, requires a complex set of marketing and financial skills that go beyond the visuals of buildings, labels, and personalities. And it’s more than communications, pricing and promotions. Basics include, as part of a long skills list, the development of a diverse strategic channel model: Three-Tier distribution, DTC (bricks & mortar visits, winery iStore, wine-club, and ecommerce), and DTT; and, the implementation of a focused market model to answer the questions of who, what, when and where your wine can and should be sold. As a wine biz bootstrapper that means going out to targeted markets and shaking a lot of the right hands, the hands of consumers, buyers and decision makers with the express intent of revenue creation. For a variety of financial and personal reasons, many lifestyle wineries still exist , and yes a few of these will close, with Roshambo being the most recent example. It seems as though Ms Brilliant is now marching to the beat of a different drummer.”

The above comment and an additional comment made by TWM on Alder’s post reflects TWM’s take on the well documented change of direction for Ms Brilliant and the Roshambo Winery. Success and failure often travel down the same road, but from this perspective, one winery’s hiatus doesn’t a stampede make.

The Winter Fancy Food Show

I attended the NASFT Fancy Food Show this past Monday, January 18th, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The production and sale of food is not only part of my life/career experience, but part of my DNA. My varied background includes stints in Disney food & beverage management and as the buyer/operator of Walt Disney World’s grocery ops. Plus, my Grandfather D.M. Sears, a food scientist, worked for the H. J. Heinz Co. in Pittsburgh, and for a leading wholesale grocery concern Reid, Murdock & Company in Chicago, before founding his own branded food production company in Ft Wayne, Indiana, producing ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut, deviled ham, relishes and pickles. The pickle business still survives as Sechler Pickles, thanks to the acquisition by Ralph Sechler of my Grandfather’s St. Joe, Indiana pickling stations. But more than being part of my DNA, I always learn quite a bit from contemporary specialty food marketers re.:

  • trends
  • packaging
  • promotions
  • marketing communications
  • relationship and business development
  • positive examples of small biz bootstaping
  • channel models and channel strategy in a consolidating market

Having only one day to cover the multi-hall location of a show with more than 1,300 exhibitors, these are booths that grabbed my attention:

J&D Foods, the home of Bacon Salt, and Baconaise and now bacon popcorn
Nueske Applewood Smoked Meats…can you say bacon. This Wisconsn based producer is very well known and valued in food service. Also, a great consumer facing brand.
Mia’s Kitchen, a division of Don & Son’s. Not only my hometown friends (I once worked for Mia’s dad), but quality sauces in top drawer packaging.
Jelly Belly, always innovating with product and packaging. Did you know that they offer Jelly Belly wine pairing recipes?
The Craft Brewers Association booth. I’m guessing that you wouldn’t be surprised to hear that this was the busiest booth at the show on Monday. Not only were interesting beers available to taste, but they were being poured but an impressively knowledgeable, somewhat quirky group of passionate brewers.

The takeaway from this event that can be of value to smaller family businesses is that in this greater CPG segment consumer facing brands are experiencing the same consolidating channels and product rich fast product cycles as wine, the following strategic actions matter:

  • Focus
  • Quality
  • Innovation
  • Packaging
  • Sharp pricing
  • Know your product
  • Have an elevator pitch
  • Professional but friendly demeanor
  • Owner involvement in sales and marketing
  • Diversified channel strategy and implementation
  • Have a real, hands-on relationship with your market

Notable Upcoming Wine Tastings

This Thursday, January 28, 2010 The Vines of Mendoza is conducting an online wine tasting with Mendoza winemaker of note, Walter Bressia. Although there are two ways to participate in this tasting, either via a Webinar, or through a real time Twitter tasting, I’m going to participate on Twitter. I’ve been looking forward to this tasting since receiving my wines from Vines of Mendoza, last week, and it looks like atleast 2 of my wine blogging colleagues will be participating,  Frank Gutierrez of Frank Loves Wine and Ward Kadel, aka drXeNo. I’ve actively participated in prior online tasting events, previously on the Taste Live platform, such as

Open that Bottle Night at Back Room Wines

Hospice du Rhone 2009 at Estate Sonoma,

Pinot Noir tasting at Wilson Daniels organized by Lisa Mattson and Agent Red of The Wine Spies

Jordon Mackay’s “Passion for Pinot”  Taste Live Event at The Jug Shop. 

All the Taste Live and Twitter wine tasting events have been a blast, and more than informative, and effective in creating wine centric conversations, while also creating brand buzz. While I’m familiar with Argentinian wines, I’m not familiar with Argentinian wines at these price points. Last year, I picked up my friend and wine biz colleague Scott Becker at the San Jose Airport at the end of a long flight from Argentina, after his plane was diverted from SFO. All he could talk about was the quality of the top end wines now available from Argentina, especially those from the Vines of Mendoza. Now I’ll be able discover for myself. As a family winery, have you considered a wine tweet-up or the Taste Live format to create buzz and awareness for your wines? If not it should be on your brand promotions calendar for 2010.

On Saturday, January 30, it’s ZAP’s 19th annual Zinfandel Festival at San Francisco’s Ft. Mason, that’s on this wine marketer’s calendar. Zinfandel has been on my map since my earliest wine tasting experiences, and this is an event that if you’re a member of the press, trade or a consumer, should be on your bucket list. I’ve been to 10 ZAPs, and circumstances prevented me from attending last year. I’m not missing this year. Yes, I know it’s crowded, and the crowd likes to have a good time, but that’s part of the excitement. And it helps to create a positive buzz, and reinforce the role that Zinfandel plays in the culture of California’s wine industry. Word is that the 2007 Vintage is outstanding. So stay tuned for my take on the ’07 Zins in a future post. I’m also looking forward to saying hi to old and new friends. Also, ZAP is not only wine blogger friendly, but on the cutting edge of recognizing the contribution made to Zin awareness by this group of communicators. So, a special thanks to my colleague, Thea Dwelle, for her contribution in making this happen. If I don’t see you online Thursday afternoon for the Vines of Mendoza Taste Live event, hope to see your IRL at ZAP.

Note: Copyright © 2010 Think Wine Marketing® All rights reserved

2 thoughts on “Haiti – Roshambo – The Winter Fancy Food Show – Wine Tastings

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